Sotheby’s Paris offered two interesting Emile Gallé items at their Design auction, May 3, 2018

Sorry, but just got back from vacation. Monday’s post will be delayed to later today or possibly tomorrow.

 


Sotheby’s Paris held a Design auction on May 3, 2018 with total sales of $11,587,000. Included in the sale were two interesting lots by Emile Gallé — the topic of today’s post.

Gallé clock, Sotheby’s lot #38

Lot #38 was a wonderful, early Emile Gallé clock from 1880. Besides lovely, colorful, geometric enameling on the glass and clock face, it had an engraved nude on the front and what appeared to be Stars of David on the sides. It had problems, as evidenced in the condition report. “One of the legs has been replaced, the enamel and gilt are completely worn and have almost disappeared, visible on the catalogue illustration. A few cracks within the face of the clock. Some restoration to the upper elements that seem to have been re-glued…”. Even with its problems, it sold above its estimate of €6,000 — €8,000, realizing €11,250 ($13,366), including buyer’s premium.

Gallé Tadpole vase, Sotheby’s lot #39

Lot #39, an important Gallé Tadpole vase with a quotation from Th. Gauthier, did not fare as well. It did not sell with an estimate of €50,000 — €70,000, as it was unable to overcome its condition problems, as evidenced in Sotheby’s condition report. “Good overall condition. Some air bubbles within the glass and a few burst bubbles to the surface, inherent to the manufacturing process. A previous V-shaped restoration on the upper part of the vase (approximately 5-7 cm x 4-5 cm). This restoration is barely visible to the bare eye, except for a crack still visible at the bottom of the V. Out of every known versions, this vase has the most sophisticated applied décor on the base.” On another note, I find it amusing that Sotheby’s stated the vase was in “good overall condition” with a restoration and a crack. Huh?

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No shows until the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018, as we were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s special about this Gallé vase?

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


One cabochon is the sun with acid-etched rays and the other is the center of a flower

Occasionally I sell a French cameo vase that is worthy of discussion. Today’s Gallé vase is quite interesting, incorporating a variety of techniques.

Notice the cabochons on this side of the vase are acid-etched

First notice the vase is transparent. That immediately tells you the vase is early Gallé, from the Cristallerie period in the 1880s-1890s. Then look at the giant applied cabochons, four in all, all different. One cabochon represents the sun, with acid-etched rays surrounding it. The others are the centers of flowers.

The “sun” cabochon has internal foil decoration, but no acid-etching

It’s interesting to note the presence of metal foil within the glass. How did they do that? There was only one way. As the molten vase was being formed on a punty (the metal rod  used to hold the vase), the metal foil was applied to the outside of the vase. While still hot, more transparent glass was applied over the entire vase, encasing the foil. Now it was inside.

Wait, there’s more. The vase was then rolled in powdered, colored glass on the marver (usually a flat metal table) several times and heated in the furnace between each application. This added a uniform colored layer of glass to the outside. Finally heated glass discs (the cabochons) were applied to the outside. Then the vase was ready for the annealing oven, where it cooled slowly over the course of a full day or more.

This is a fancy, acid-etched Gallé signature only found on early vases

We’re not finished as there’s no design on the vase yet. So it went to an artist who covered the vase with a resist (a waxy substance or other acid-resistant covering like bituminous paint). The vase then went into a tank of hydrofluoric acid, where the unprotected glass was eaten away. Voila, the vase then had a design, but was still unfinished.

Notice the wheel-carving in the background on the left, the internal foil and the acid-etching of the cabochon

The flaws in the background were removed by wheel-carving. (You can see the wheel marks when turning the vase in reflected light.) The very last step was to heat the outside of the vase with a broad flame. This technique is called fire-polishing and gave a shine to the exterior. The vase was finished and I’m tired just thinking about it!

I hope now you have a better understanding and appreciation of all the time and effort that went into this special vase.


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Strong results for Tiffany Studios’ items at Julia’s Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry auction, December 1, 2017

Monday’s post will be up by noon.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Sorry for the temporary outage on my website and blog yesterday, January 17, 2018. There were some technical problems that were resolved, so everything should be up and running just fine now.

James D. Julia, Inc., held a Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry sale on December 1, 2017, with total sales over $2,500,000. The results were relatively strong for the entire sale, but especially strong for Tiffany Studios’ glass and lamps. 16 of the 17 highest priced lots were Tiffany Studios’ lamps — impressive, considering there were 739 lots in the sale.

Rare Tiffany Butterfly table lamp, Julia’s lot #1473

The top lots of the sale, #s 1428, 1473, and 1516, were all Tiffany Studios’ lamps that each sold for the identical price of $84,700, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Treasure Chest inkwell, Julia’s lot #1453

A rare and very desirable Tiffany Treasure Chest inkwell, lot #1453, sold for approximately twice its high estimate of $7,000, realizing $17,545, including buyer’s premium.

Rare Gallé Butterfly vase, Julia’s lot #1115

The top lot of the French cameo glass portion of the sale was #1115, a rare wheel-carved Gallé Butterfly vase. It was an interesting vase, technically very sophisticated, but not as eye-appealing as it could have been with muted colors and no decoration between the butterflies. It sold just below its low estimate of $18,000, realizing $19,360, including buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here. You will have to sign in (free) to see the prices.


The Miami shows are only two weeks away, with the first on February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. I’ve been beating the bushes finding new treasures and have come up with some beauties. I just listed over 18 new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look.

I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Tiffany Studios Favrile glass sells well at Skinner’s 20th Century Design sale, December 14, 2017

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Happy New Year, everyone! Here’s hoping that 2018 will be a great year, especially if our illustrious politicians don’t screw it up.

Skinner’s Auction, Boston, MA, held its 20th Century Design sale on December 14, 2017. Included in the sale was a lovely collection of Tiffany Favrile glass from the estate of Nan Edwards. The results were excellent.

Fabulous Tiffany red Favrile exhibition vase, Skinner lot #72

The top lot of the group was #72, a killer red decorated Favrile vase marked “Exhibition”, meaning it was made to exhibit at a fair. Exhibition vases are usually top quality and quite rare. It went on the block with an estimate of $4,000-6,000 and soared to $33,210, including buyer’s premium — not surprising considering its quality and rarity.

Tiffany Favrile black decorated millifiori vase, Skinner lot #76

Lot #76 was another fine Tiffany Favrile example from the collection of Nan Edwards. The quality and rarity of this black decorated millifiori vase made up for its small, 4¾” size. It sold for over 10 times its high estimate of $900, realizing $12,300, including buyer’s premium.

Early Gallé Crystallerie vase, Skinner lot #179A

For the most part, the French glass offerings were quite weak, except for lot #179A. It was a superb example of 19th century Gallé Crystallerie glass, with a grasshopper and flowers. At 9″ tall, it was offered with an unrealistically low estimate of $400- $600. It sold for a very fair price of $10,455.

Fake Gallé jar, Skinner lot #178

Embarrassingly Skinner sold lot 178 as authentic Gallé glass, when in fact it was an obvious reproduction. I guess they were fooled because it came from the collection of Nan Edwards. It means that Nan Edwards was fooled first and then Skinners. I suggest the buyer return it immediately.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. I’ve been beating the bushes finding new treasures and have come up with some beauties. I just listed over 10 new items on my website and will list another 10 or more within the first week of January. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look.

I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Leslie Hindman sold the Estate of Robert Smith in its Modern Design sale, 11/14/17

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Chicago, IL, held their Modern Design sale on 11/14/17. Included in the sale was the Estate of Robert Smith, which consisted mostly of French cameo glass. Don Williams was Robert’s main source for glass, until Don passed away a few years ago. Then Robert turned to me to continue collecting. He passed away last year from a rare form of bone cancer.

Daum Nancy Alpine vase, Hindman lot #467

I was anxious to buy back some of the glass that I’d sold to him, especially lot #467, a beautiful and rare Daum Nancy Alpine scenic vase, but it eluded me. It sold for $12,500, against an estimate of $4,000 – $6,000. I was the underbidder. The buyer who bought it paid a fair price, but it was just beyond what a dealer can pay and still make a fair return on his investment.

B&S vase, Hindman lot #468

Robert’s collection included more than a few fine examples of internally decorated Burgun & Schverer (B&S) vases. I was successful in purchasing a couple of them. The top result of the group went to lot #468, probably because collectors appreciated the rare shape. It sold for $8,125, against an estimate of $4,000 – $6,000.

B&S Orchids vase, Hindman lot #472

Lot #472 was beautiful and sold for a song, because of a major flaw on the backside, original to the making. It sold for $2,750 against an estimate of $2,000 – $4,000. I wasn’t going to buy it at any price, but the collector who did, bought an impressive vase at a very low price.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. That gives us time to beat the bushes to find new treasures and take some time to smell the figurative roses. November is usually a good month for business. Then business dies in December because most people are looking for less expensive Christmas gifts than we offer. Occasionally we make a Christmas sale, but that’s the exception, not the rule. Cold weather and the New Year bring a new wave of enthusiasm.

I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A few French cameo glass results from recent auctions

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Gallé Tulip vase, Treadway Toomey lot #113

Treadway Toomey Auctions of Chicago, IL, held their Art In Glass: Collection of Joan & Milton Baxt sale on Saturday, November 11, 2017. Included in the sale was one fine lot of Gallé glass, with provenance from Minna Rosenblatt Ltd., New York City, August 2, 1986. With four layers of colored glass on a salmon background, great detail, and a nice 15″ size, it was much better than most Gallé vases that have come up for auction recently. The multiple layers allowed for an unusual effect, with tulips on the back looking like the negative of those on the front. Couple fine quality, market freshness and a low estimate of $2,000 – $4,000 and you’ve got the recipe for a great result. The vase sold for $15,000, including buyer’s premium. I tried to buy it, but it flew past my price to a full retail price.

Gallé Moth vase, Humler & Nolan lot #0572

Humler & Nolan of Cincinnati, OH, held a pottery, glass and Rookwood auction on November 4-5, 2017. Included in the glass section of the sale were a few good items, along with more than a few ordinary items. Lot #0572 was a small (3¾” tall x 4½” long), but very high quality, Gallé vase with wheel-carved moths. Wheel-carving by hand yields a level of detail that is not attainable with acid-etching only. When done by a skilled craftsman, the result can be wonderful. This example was no exception, with great artistry, on a very rare shape. Collectors were willing to overlook the small size and bid the vase to $13,310, against an estimate of $2,500 – $3,000. I, on the other hand, was unable to buy it at a price where I thought I could resell it.

Daum Nancy Cornflower pitcher, Humler & Nolan lot #0622

Lot #0622 was a nice, but unspectacular, Daum Nancy pitcher with Cornflower decoration. Estimated near retail value, $5,000 – $7,000, it sold for the low estimate, $6,050, including buyer’s premium. I had no interest in this item and did not bid.

For the complete results of the Treadway Toomey sale, click here. For the complete results of the Humler & Nolan sale, click here.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. That gives us time to beat the bushes to find new treasures and take some time to smell the figurative roses. November is usually a good month for business. Then business dies in December because most people are looking for less expensive Christmas gifts than we offer. Occasionally we make a Christmas sale, but that’s the exception, not the rule. Cold weather and the New Year bring a new wave of enthusiasm.

I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The results of the Denver World Wide Antique Show, October 20-22, 2017

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. The weather is getting colder and my show schedule is picking up, so I will try to publish twice weekly again. If readership picks up, I will continue to publish twice weekly, as often as possible.


I’m starting on Friday to write a contemporaneous account for Monday’s blog.

There were a fair number of people in my booth on Friday morning

Friday, 3 PM: The show is off to a very slow start. There have been a fair number of people, but only a few inquiries, mostly not serious. No sales yet, not even close.

One of the dealers told me that important clients will be coming to the show. I know them, since they bought from us the first time we exhibited in Denver several years ago. Hopefully they’ll come.

Friday, 6 PM: The first day is over and I’m hopeful. We made one small sale, but we also have a client who is contemplating a major Tiffany lamp purchase. Got my fingers crossed that’s going to happen.

Part of the Gallé glass we had on exhibit at the show

Saturday, 3:30 PM: Interesting day. The wealthy couple who was going to come to the show are here, but so far have completely ignored my booth. Didn’t think it would go that way. Another client is here who is also seriously interested in the same Tiffany lamp as yesterday, but neither has pulled the trigger. We did make one decent sale earlier, but that’s it. The total thus far is two sales, not nearly enough for a decent show. That could turn around in an instant. I’m still cautiously optimistic.

Sunday, 12:00 PM: We made another sale yesterday afternoon, so we’re up to three. The problem is that the totals are insufficient to make it worthwhile to travel from New York. At this point, we might be close to breaking even. Whoop dee do.

My best prospect for selling an important Tiffany lamp has demurred. My second best prospect is highly unlikely to purchase it. And the wealthy couple who came to the show never even said hello, let alone step foot into our booth. So as of this moment, we’re finished with Denver. But that’s subject to change. We’ll see what happens by the end of the day.

We sold this lovely Amphora portrait vase at the show

Sunday, 4:00 PM: The show is over and the verdict is in. We made one additional small sale today, but the total was only good enough for a local show, not for a long-distance show. Oh well. We like the show and would have loved to return, but business is business. Hasta la vista, Denver.

Print the coupon above for a $2 discount on admission

Now we’re off to Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll travel to Winnetka, Illinois the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to it.

I hope to be able to add a number of wonderful examples of recent purchases to my website, but I’ve been busy, so it’s been hard to find the time. If you’re looking for something, send me an email. I’ll make the time to respond to your request.


I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Setting up at the Denver World Wide Antique Show, October 18, 2017

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. The weather is getting colder and my show schedule is picking up, so I will try to publish twice weekly again. If readership picks up, I will continue to publish twice weekly, as often as possible.


October 20-22, 2017

Yesterday was the first day of setting up at the Denver World Wide Antique Show. We have a nice large booth, in the center of the show, allowing the setup to go as smoothly as possible. We finished about three-quarters of the work and will finish the rest today.

Part of the enormous amount of furniture offered at the show

In asking around, I was told that the October Denver show was the best of the three Denver shows, so there will be no excuses. If we can’t do well in Denver in October, then Denver is not a city for us. Tune in Monday for the results.

One of the fine dealers at the show

The show is larger than the summer version and looks like it will be enjoyable for the public. There’s a large variety of dealers and merchandise from jewelry to paintings to furniture to glass and lamps. (I’m not the only glass dealer in the show, even though I have the most and the best.)

Part of our huge selection of Daum and Gallé at the show

We have a great selection of American and French glass and lamps, including Tiffany, Handel, Daum Nancy and Gallé, to mention a few. Come visit the show and consider making a purchase, especially if you would like us to return.

Print the coupon above for a $2 discount on admission

Next week we’ll travel to Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll travel to Winnetka, Illinois the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to it.

I hope to be able to add a number of wonderful examples of recent purchases to my website, but I’ve been busy, so it’s been hard to find the time. If you’re looking for something, send me an email. I’ll make the time to respond to your request.


I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A hastily planned buying trip to Europe

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, readership slows down in the summer, so I will only publish on Mondays until the weather gets cold and readership picks up.


The Divi Resort on St. Maarten before the hurricane

The Divi Resort post hurricane

Our vacation to St. Maarten in September was planned months in advance. Of course September is a risky month to plan a trip to the Caribbean, but the odds were with us that nothing would happen the exact week we planned. However, this is one of those times that we hit the unfortunate jackpot and so did the poor people of St. Maarten. The island was devastated by Hurricane Irma, forcing us to change plans. So we decided to change the trip to a business trip to Europe. There are worse places to visit than London and Paris.

Apparently travel to Europe in September is quite brisk. Makes sense. The summer crowds are gone and the weather is nearly perfect. It just makes for expensive tickets. We needed to start our trip in London, but the only way we could get there at a reasonable price was to fly to Orly in Paris, then take a bus to Charles De Gaulle Airport, then take a flight to Gatwick Airport outside of London, then take a train into London, then take an Uber to our hotel. So after 21½ hours of travel to London, we were wiped out. It would have taken less time to fly to Japan.

We found these incredible windows in Paris that we are considering purchasing

But we managed to buy well in London and then after a couple of days, we flew to Paris, where we spent a little more time and bought well there too. We sent photos from Europe to our best clients who bought quite a few things. Additionally we bought still more that will be shipped to us in time for our upcoming shows in Denver, Detroit and Winnetka.

My lovely wife, Lia, is shielding her eyes from the sun in the Marché Paul Bert

The flea markets in the north of Paris are a good place to find a large concentration of antique dealers. There isn’t any type of French antique that you can’t find there. Head to an area called St. Ouen (pronounced almost like San Juan) in the north of Paris. You can take the #4 Metro to the last station, Porte de Clignancourt, and then it’s a short walk. Weekends are the time to go.


October 20-22, 2017

Our next show will be in Denver, October 20-22, 2017. We’re giving Denver one last shot to prove it’s worthwhile traveling all the way from New York. If the show doesn’t go well, goodbye Denver. The following week we’ll be in Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll be in Winnetka, Illinois, the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to seeing our old friends.

Click Philip Chasen’s new items to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I recently added several new items and I’ll be adding more this week. They’re some of the best items I’ve ever had, so please take a look.

I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Gallé blownout vases are treasures worth owning

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, readership slows down in the summer, so I will only publish on Mondays until the weather gets cold and readership picks up.


Rare and exceptional Gallé Apple blownout vase

Emile Gallé never lived to see the innovations that took place at his factory after his death in 1904. In the 1920s compressed air was used to inject molten glass into molds (just like Lalique vases). These vases are referred to as blownout, mold-blown, or soufflé — all interchangeable terms.

Red Gallé Plum blownout vase

Blue-purple Gallé Plum blownout vase

Green and yellow Gallé Plum blownout vase

After the vase was formed in the mold, it was treated like other cameo vases. Layers of colored glass were applied to the molten vase, one on top of another. Upon cooling, artists used wax resists and hydrofluoric acid to etch the designs and reveal the colors below. This meant that the same model could be made in many color combinations.

A rare Gallé Elephant blownout vase

I estimate there are approximately 50 different models of Gallé blownout vases, with the Elephant and Rhododendron models the rarest and most valuable.

Prices vary over time and not always up. Prices for the more common models have softened in the last year, so it’s a really good time to add to your collection. It’s similar to the stock market. I add to my portfolio when a stock I like goes on sale. This is your opportunity. Today’s prices range from under $10,000 to over $200,000. Most models are under $20,000.


Our next show will be in Denver, October 20-22, 2017. We’re giving Denver one last shot to prove it’s worthwhile traveling all the way from New York. If the show doesn’t go well, goodbye Denver. The following week we’ll be in Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll be in Winnetka, Illinois, the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to seeing our old friends.

Click Philip Chasen’s new items to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I recently added several new items and I’ll be adding more this week. They’re some of the best items I’ve ever had, so please take a look.

I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.