The results of the Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show, May 18-20, 2018

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


The Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show ended yesterday after a three-day run from May 18-20, 2018. We had a decent show. Explanation to follow.

Following is a contemporaneous account of the show events.

Preview party attendees were all gathered in the aisles, having no interest in purchasing anything from anybody.

Thursday, 8:30PM The preview party is in full swing and absolutely nothing is going on in our booth. There are more people this year than last, but that doesn’t make a difference. The attendees are here for a social event and the dealers are the decorations. There has been very little interest and, of course, no sales. The only thing better this year was the open bar. The food was a disaster of hummus, carrot sticks, and a few hors d’oeuvres, with raw artichokes and raw Brussels sprouts for decoration. To top it off, one of our best clients canceled on us because of an injury.

Friday afternoon in our booth

Friday, 2 PM The show opened to the public this morning at 11 AM. There were only a few people on line. Attendance has been relatively light to this point, as well as interest. No sales yet. To make things worse, I cannot connect my computer to the wifi. My phone connects, but my computer refuses.

Friday, 6:30 PM The Merchandise Mart sent a tech to help with my computer connection. She diagnosed and solved the problem fairly quickly. Thank you!

Business was basically non-existent for the day until our long-term clients showed up near the end of the day. They made a nice purchase, so we’re off to a decent start, however we have not yet met our expenses.

Saturday afternoon in our booth

Saturday, 4:00 PM Attendance was a little better today, but business was still quite slow. We made one nice sale to a new client (which is always gratifying). We’re waiting for one of our best clients to arrive later this afternoon.

We sold this important red Tiffany Favrile Tel el Amarna vase at the show

Saturday, 6:30 PM Our good clients arrived late in the day and made a significant purchase. Thanks to them we had a good show.

Sunday afternoon in our booth

Sunday, 1:30 PM Attendance is noticeably better today, partly because the weather is unpleasant. (Bad weather is good for attendance.) A few people seem genuinely interested in some items. We’ll see if that translates to sales later in the day.

Sunday, 5:00 PM The show is over and we’re satisfied. All of today’s talk and potential ended with a decent sale and a small sale. It’s about all we could ask for a Sunday.

We did about the same business and profit as last year. Expenses were high for this show, so it ate into our net. We’ll take a smaller booth next year to trim expenses. Overall I’d say the show was a success, not unconditional, but nevertheless a success.


I’m looking forward to the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show show, August 30 – September 2, 2018. There’s always good attendance and action. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Works by Patrick Nagel led Heritage Auctions’ Illustration Art sale, April 24, 2018

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


Heritage Auctions, Dallas, Texas, held an Illustration Art sale on April 24, 2018, with total sales of $1,357,487 for the 451 lots offered. Works by Patrick Nagel led the sale, taking the first and fourth places.

Patrick Nagel acrylic on canvas painting Nude on Back with Black Stockings, Heritage lot #71150

The top lot of the sale was #71150, a 1983 acrylic on canvas painting by Patrick Nagel entitled Nude on Back with Black Stockings. It sold for $106,250, including buyer’s premium — approximately double its low estimate of $50,000. I don’t understand Nagel’s work or why it’s so desirable, but someone does.

Alberto Vargas, Martini Time, Heritage lot #71202

I do understand the appeal of Alberto Vargas. His paintings scored the second, seventh and eleventh highest prices of the sale, $87,500, $27,500, and $18,750, respectively. Lot #71202, Martini Time, a watercolor and pencil on paper from 1935, sold for $87,500, including buyer’s premium, well above its high estimate of $50,000.

Gil Elvgren Perfection, Heritage lot #71058

Gil Elvgren has scored the top slots in other illustration art sales, but had to settle for the fifth and eighth ones in this sale. His 1948 painting Perfection sold for $57,500, below its pre-sale estimate of $60,000 – $80,000. Recent results for Elvgren’s works have weakened.

For the complete results of the sale, click here. You will have to sign in for the prices (free).


The Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart will open next week, May 18-20, 2018. We’re pretty excited about it and you should be too. Please make your plans to attend!

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Tiffany lamps sold well at Sotheby’s, New York Luxe: Art of Design sale, April 22, 2018

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


Sotheby’s New York, held a Luxe: Art of Design sale this past weekend with total sales of $4,991,877. The 584 lots were sold over two days, April 20 and 22, 2018 (which was unusual because most multi-part sales are held on consecutive days). Included in the sale was a small selection of Tiffany lamps and glass — today’s topic.

It’s a good thing I went to preview the auction in person. The two best lamps, that looked wonderful in the photos, didn’t look quite as wonderful in person. Both lot #1367, an Allamanda, and lot #1368, a Tulip, had extensive cracking and restoration.

Tiffany 16″ diameter Tulip table lamp, Sotheby’s lot #1368

Regardless, lot #1368, the 16″ diameter Tulip lamp, sold well above its high estimate of $30,000, realizing $47,500, including buyer’s premium, for the highest price of the Tiffany selection.

Tiffany Allamanda lamp, Sotheby’s lot #1367

Lot #1367, an 18″ diameter Allamanda, sold near its high estimate of $35,000, realizing $42,500, including buyer’s premium — the second highest price of the Tiffany selection. That’s a pretty good price considering the lamp had damage, restoration and a simple base. If the buyer wants to upgrade to a library base, it will cost about $7,500 additional, if someone is willing to take the existing base in a trade.

Tiffany gold doré 10-light lily table lamp, lot #1372

A decent 10-light lily lamp, lot #1372, sold above its high estimate of $20,000, realizing $27,500, including buyer’s premium. The shades were fairly well matched, but the gold doré base had some wear and corrosion.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


Our next show is now only three weeks away, May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The results of Heritage Auctions’ The Estate of Zsa Zsa Gabor auction, April 13, 2018

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


Heritage Auctions, Dallas, TX, sold The Estate of Zsa Zsa Gabor at auction on April 13, 2018. Sales totaled $909,209 for the 480 lots offered. Interestingly, there were no estimates because the sale was totally unreserved. That meant that every item sold with no minimum price. Conceivably an item could have sold for $1 + buyer’s premium, but in actuality the lowest price paid was for lot #65328, three letters written to Zsa Zsa, which sold for $175, including buyer’s premium.

The estate was consigned to Heritage Auctions by her ninth husband, Frédéric Prinz von Anhalt. He became her sole remaining heir after the deaths of her sisters and daughter. Zsa Zsa Gabor died on December 18, 2016, at the age of 99. Click on Zsa Zsa Gabor’s name for a link to her very interesting Wikipedia page. Click on von Anhalt’s name for a link to his Wikipedia page. His is quite the story, starting with the purchase of his title.

Margaret Keane Portrait of Zsa Zsa Gabor, Heritage lot #65140

The top lot of the sale was #65140, an oil on canvas painting by Margaret Keane, Portrait of Zsa Zsa Gabor, which sold for $45,000, including buyer’s premium.

Pal Fried portrait of Zsa Zsa and her daughter, Francesca, Heritage lot #65047

Zsa Zsa possessed many paintings by her fellow Hungarian compatriot, Pal Fried, all of which were included in the sale. Lot #65047 was a beautiful, oversize portrait of Zsa Zsa and her daughter, Francesca. It was sold for $7,500, including buyer’s premium, purchased by yours truly.

Heritage lot #65191

In a creepy, ghoulish section of the sale, someone paid $1,187.50 for each of two lots of Zsa Zsa’s pill containers, #s 65212 and 65192. I’m sorry, but that’s nuts. Can’t we leave the woman with a little dignity?

Much of the sale is devoted to her clothing, jewelry, furniture and personal possessions. For the complete results, click here. You will have to sign in to see the prices (free).


Our next show is now only a month away, May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

I tried to buy a couple of interesting items at auction…

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


I recently tried to buy a couple of nice items at auction. I hoped they would fall through the cracks so I could buy them for resale. But alas, they did not. They sold for retail prices, so I wasn’t the buyer.

Tiffany Studios Pine Needle clock, Fontaine lot #2

The first item was a very nice Tiffany Studios clock in the Pine Needle pattern. It sold at Fontaine Auction Gallery’s Antiques & Fine Art auction in Pittsfield, Massachusetts on March 24, 2018 as lot #2. Against a low estimate, it realized $6,655, including buyer’s premium. That’s a fine price for a retail buyer, but not a dealer, so I wasn’t the buyer.

For the complete results of Fontaine’s sale, click here.

Quezal lily shade sconce, similar in design to Bonham’s chandelier pictured below

Quezal chandelier, Bonham’s lot #221

The second item sold as lot #221 in Bonham’s Elegant Home sale in Los Angeles on March 26, 2018. It was a wonderful original Quezal chandelier with nine matching shades. I’ve seen a similar, smaller model before, in the form of a wall sconce with lily shades, but never the matching chandelier. Bonham’s lot was an original mashup of four sconces made into one huge chandelier. How cool is that! It sold for $7,500, including buyer’s premium, against a very low estimate of $1,000 – $1,500. Again, the price was just fine for a retail buyer, but not a dealer, so I didn’t buy it.

For the complete results of Bonham’s sale, click here.


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Tiffany Studios lamps and objects sold well at Cottone’s Fine Art, Antiques & Clocks sale, Mar 24, 2018

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


Cottone Auctions held a Fine Art, Antiques & Clocks on Mar 24, 2018. Included in the sale was a nice selection of Tiffany Studios leaded lamps and objects.

Tiffany Studios Bamboo floor lamp, Cottone lot #330

The top lot of the Tiffany Studios group was #330, a Bamboo floor lamp. It sold above its estimated range of $100,000 – $150,000, realizing $241,900, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Moorish chain mail hall lantern, Cottone lot #331

Lot #331 was a rare and interesting Tiffany Studios Moorish hall lantern with chain mail decoration. It sold well above its estimate of $7,000 – $10,000, realizing $23,010, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Butterfly inkwell, Cottone lot #339

The top result for Tiffany Studios objects was lot #339, a rare Tiffany Studios Butterfly inkwell, with an original iridescent blue Favrile insert and cap. It also sold well above its estimate of $7,000 – $10,000, realizing $18,500, including buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here. You will have to enter your email address to see the prices realized.


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s special about this Gallé vase?

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


One cabochon is the sun with acid-etched rays and the other is the center of a flower

Occasionally I sell a French cameo vase that is worthy of discussion. Today’s Gallé vase is quite interesting, incorporating a variety of techniques.

Notice the cabochons on this side of the vase are acid-etched

First notice the vase is transparent. That immediately tells you the vase is early Gallé, from the Cristallerie period in the 1880s-1890s. Then look at the giant applied cabochons, four in all, all different. One cabochon represents the sun, with acid-etched rays surrounding it. The others are the centers of flowers.

The “sun” cabochon has internal foil decoration, but no acid-etching

It’s interesting to note the presence of metal foil within the glass. How did they do that? There was only one way. As the molten vase was being formed on a punty (the metal rod  used to hold the vase), the metal foil was applied to the outside of the vase. While still hot, more transparent glass was applied over the entire vase, encasing the foil. Now it was inside.

Wait, there’s more. The vase was then rolled in powdered, colored glass on the marver (usually a flat metal table) several times and heated in the furnace between each application. This added a uniform colored layer of glass to the outside. Finally heated glass discs (the cabochons) were applied to the outside. Then the vase was ready for the annealing oven, where it cooled slowly over the course of a full day or more.

This is a fancy, acid-etched Gallé signature only found on early vases

We’re not finished as there’s no design on the vase yet. So it went to an artist who covered the vase with a resist (a waxy substance or other acid-resistant covering like bituminous paint). The vase then went into a tank of hydrofluoric acid, where the unprotected glass was eaten away. Voila, the vase then had a design, but was still unfinished.

Notice the wheel-carving in the background on the left, the internal foil and the acid-etching of the cabochon

The flaws in the background were removed by wheel-carving. (You can see the wheel marks when turning the vase in reflected light.) The very last step was to heat the outside of the vase with a broad flame. This technique is called fire-polishing and gave a shine to the exterior. The vase was finished and I’m tired just thinking about it!

I hope now you have a better understanding and appreciation of all the time and effort that went into this special vase.


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

I sold a few French cameo glass treasures in 2017

For the foreseeable future I will publish once a week on Mondays.


As most of you know, I’ve specialized for decades in the finest French cameo glass. I am continually buying and selling. Here are a few of the best items I sold in 2017.

Magnificent Gallé tulip vase

Gallé glass doesn’t get much better than this incredible 14″ wheel-carved Tulip vase. It’s not an understatement to call it killer.

Daum Poppy vase


Daum vases with padded and wheel-carved flowers are very sophisticated and usually beautiful, as evidenced by this gorgeous vase with three differently colored poppies. The white layer below each flower creates more opacity and contrast for a beautiful effect.

Argy-Rousseau Lion vase

I sold many Argy-Rousseau pâte-de-verre vases and lamps in 2017. This Lion example is one of the most beautiful. I’ve sold this model before, but never with such striking color.

I’m always looking to buy quality French cameo glass, so call or email me with your items for sale. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me. And don’t forget to email me with your wants. I may have what you want or know where to find it.


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

How to clean antique glass including Tiffany Studios Favrile glass and French cameo glass

Monday’s post will be up by noon.

Please note that I am permanently changing Thursday’s post day to Friday.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Fridays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Friday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Every once in a while, I will re-post one of my most widely viewed blogs of the last nine years. This is one of the top three, originally written on September 14, 2009.

Having sold many thousands of antique glass vases over the years, I’ve learned a lot about how to clean them from trial and error. It also doesn’t hurt to have a Master’s Degree in Chemistry.

Most people are quite timid about using chemicals on glass. They’re afraid they’ll ruin their vases by removing the decoration or somehow damaging them. There are very few times this would actually be true. Cold-painted decoration on a vase could be ruined by the use of some chemicals but Tiffany Favrile vases and French cameo vases by Daum, Gallé, and others have no cold-painting, so all of the steps I describe below are appropriate. If you suspect that your vase has cold-painting on it, test a small area with one of the cleaners below, using a Q-tip. If any color comes off, stop and use only the mildest cleaners.

Eco-House citrous thinner

Eco-House citrous thinner

The first step is to remove any sticky substances, which will dissolve in organic solvents such as mineral spirits or acetone (nail polish remover). There are also some good  commercial products available, such as Goo Gone, available at stores like Home Depot or Office Depot, or online. Another product I like is citrous thinner, made from orange peels. It smells a lot better than the other solvents and is quite effective. Click here if you’d like to order it.

Start by looking for anything sticky with your eyes and your fingers. Put very little solvent on a Q-tip, rag or paper towel. Rub the affected area until the dirt or stickiness is gone. Mineral spirits is a gentler solvent than acetone, so try it first. Mineral spirits is especially good for removing the gum from old labels. Use acetone second, if you need a stronger solvent. These various solvents will also remove crayon, sap, or any similar substance.

Easy-Off Fume Free

Easy-Off Fume Free

Next we’re ready for aqueous cleaning. I suggest you do this in a sink. Most of the cleaners will make your vase slippery, so be very careful not to lose control and break it. The gentlest cleaners are dishwashing liquid or Windex. I like to use them with an old toothbrush. Scrub the vase with the first cleaner and see if the dirt comes off. If it’s stubborn, you can proceed to the next level of cleaning power with commercial products like Scrubbing Bubbles or Dow Bathroom Cleaner. Repeat the process. Spray the vase, let it sit for a few minutes and clean again with a toothbrush or similar brush. If that’s not strong enough, you can go to the highest level of cleaning power — Easy-Off, of which there are two types available. The blue can, labeled “Fume Free” is the one I recommend. (It’s not really fume free, but it’s not too bad.) It’s powerful and should remove any leftover dirt. Finally, rinse your vase thoroughly in plain water and dry completely with an old towel. If it’s safe, let it dry upside down. It’s a good idea to use gloves to protect your hands, an apron to protect your clothing and glasses to protect your eyes. Easy-Off in the yellow can is lye (sodium hydroxide). It’s very powerful. It will eat through the dirt nicely, but also through your clothes and skin, and can severely damage your eyes. Immediately flush with plain water if you have an accident. You’ll know you’ve gotten it on your skin if it feels slimy.

To clean the inside of your vase, you’ll need various brushes to reach hard-to-get-to areas. Just use one of the sprays above, let sit, and brush away. Justman Brush Company sells hundreds of different brushes.

A sick vase whose glass has been etched on the interior

Vases that have been filled with water can present bigger problems, such as scratches on the interior. The second and more serious problem is sick glass, which includes etching of the glass interior or the depositing of lime or other minerals. Etching will appear as frosting, while depositing will appear as white crust. Cleaners will not effectively fix these problems. The only real way to treat problems of this sort is to go to an expert who can “tumble” the vase to resurface the interior. It’s basically the same as sandpapering the entire interior — great for a transparent vase, but not as good for a vase that has a finish on the interior, like an iridescent vase. Use this link for Paul Nulton, who used to do this kind of work, but may or may not still be in business.

Sometimes vases were kept in homes where the owners smoked or had smoky fireplaces or stoves. The vase will probably appear to have dingy color. With a minimum amount of effort, the results can be quite gratifying, revealing unexpected bright and beautiful colors!

Good luck! (Have a good story to tell me? Please send it to philip@chasenantiques.com)


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A construction update for the renovated Miami Beach Convention Center

Please note that I am permanently changing Thursday’s post day to Friday.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Fridays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Friday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


A view of the west side of the convention center, looking north

Last month I visited the Miami Beach Convention Center to check on the progress of the construction. I wanted to get a first-hand impression to form my own opinion. I’m feeling better now. It looks to me it will be completed in time for next year’s Original Miami Beach Antique Show in January, 2019.

The construction on the Washington Ave. (east) side of the building is ahead of the west side.

Construction on the west side of the building was taking longer because it was completely razed and rebuilt. Construction on the east side (Washington Ave.) was closer to completion because it was only renovated.

The northwest corner of the building. I don’t know what that circular structure is.

I spoke to a construction worker onsite who told me plans were to complete all the construction by August. That would seem to leave a cushion of time for unexpected delays until the show in January, 2019. I’d like to believe it to be true. I don’t think the temporary relocation of the show to the Miami Dade Exposition Fairgrounds was a good thing. It seemed to take all of the excitement and pizzazz out of the show.

Looking east at the west side of the building. The old parking lot is on the left.

It will be nice to be back at the Convention Center for next year’s show. Got my fingers crossed.


Our next show is not until May 18-20, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the 2nd edition of the resurrected Chicago Antiques + Art + Design Show at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. It’s a wonderful venue for a show that deserved to be restored from purgatory.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.