Tiffany Studios lamps sold well at Cottone Auctions Fine Art & Antique Auction, September 29, 2018

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


Cottone Auctions, Geneseo, NY, held a Fine Art & Antique Auction sale on September 29, 2018. Included in the 352-lot sale was a nice selection of lamps, glass and accessories by Tiffany Studios. Following is a review of some of those items.

Tiffany Studios 22″ Nasturtium table lamp, Cottone lot #106

The top lot of the sale was #106, a fine 22″ diameter Nasturtium table lamp. It sold well above its estimate of $60,000 – $80,000, realizing $134,520, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Studios 18″ Oriental Poppy table lamp, Cottone lot #97

The second best result was achieved by lot #97, a smaller 18″ Oriental Poppy table lamp. It also exceeded its estimate of $60,000 – $80,000, realizing $112,100, including buyer’s premium. (In case you haven’t noticed, red flowers are quite desirable.)

Tiffany Studios Octopus inkwell and stand, Cottone lot #101

A rare Tiffany Octopus inkwell and stand, with a gold Favrile insert, sold within its estimate of $3,000 – $5,000, realizing $5,192, including buyer’s premium. I didn’t participate in the sale, but if I had, I would have been the buyer. I think it’s a $10,000 inkwell.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No shows for another three weeks, when we will exhibit at Antiques + Modernism Winnetka (IL), November 1-4, 2018. We always look forward to our twice yearly exhibits in the greater Chicago area. But remember we’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. 

I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Banksy painting self-destructs after selling for $1.4 Million at Sotheby’s London

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


This past weekend, in a delicious bit of black humor, a painting by the renowned street artist, Banksy, self-destructed immediately after selling at a Sotheby’s London auction for £1,000,000 (approximately $1,400,000). For the complete article in the NY Times, click here. And for CNN’s take, including a video, click here.


No shows for approximately one month until we exhibit at Antiques + Modernism Winnetka (IL), November 1-4, 2018. We always look forward to our twice yearly exhibits in the greater Chicago area. But remember we’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. 

I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Rago Auctions, Lambertville, NJ, held an Early 20th C. Design sale on September 22, 2018

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.

Sorry, but there will not be a new post this Monday, as I’m on vacation.


Rago Auctions, Lambertville, NJ, held an Early 20th C. Design sale on September 22, 2018. Included in the 428-lot sale were a selection of ceramics by George Ohr, the Martin Brothers, Newcomb College and Rookwood. The makers of the glass selection were R. Lalique, Emile Gallé, Daum Nancy and Tiffany Studios, among others.

Martin Bros. bird, Rago lot #327

The top lot of the sale was a large, 16¾”, Martin Brothers bird tobacco jar. It sold for its low estimate of $112,500, including buyer’s premium. The market has shifted in the last couple of years to the best examples, which are still doing well. In my opinion, this example wasn’t particularly special, but it was big.

The other Martin bird in the sale, lot #328, sold within its estimate of $20,000 – $30,000, realizing $26,250, including buyer’s premium.

George Ohr handled vase, Rago lot #236

A wonderful, colorful, 7¾” George Ohr vase with handles and a twist brought the third highest price of the sale. It realized $56,250, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $37,500 – $42,500.

Daum Nancy Spring scenic vase, Rago lot #408

Lot #408 was a lovely Daum Nancy scenic vase. It sold above its high estimate of $2,000, realizing $5,625, including buyer’s premium. I was the underbidder. Upon later reflection, I should have bid more. It was beautiful and rare.

Tiffany Studios Favrile Cypriote vase, Rago lot #418

The selection of objects by Tiffany Studios was weak, except for lot #418, a Tiffany Favrile Cypriote vase, with provenance from Minna Rosenblatt. It sold for $10,625, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $4,000 – $6,000.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No shows until Antiques + Modernism Winnetka (IL), November 1-4, 2018. We always look forward to our twice yearly exhibits in the greater Chicago area. But remember we’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. 

I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The results of the Toomey & Co. Art & Design sale, September 16, 2018

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


Toomey & Co. Auctioneers, Oak Park, IL, held an Art & Design sale yesterday, September 16, 2018. Included in the sale were a number of ceramic and glass lots by Newcomb College, Tiffany Studios, Gallé and Daum — the subject of today’s blog.

Newcomb College chocolate set, Toomey lot #214

Lot #214 was a Newcomb College chocolate set. It sold well, exceeding its high estimate of $12,000, realizing $16,250, including buyer’s premium. I’m quite fond of the work of Newcomb College, but I tend to buy only scenic vases, rather than floral items. It’s just personal taste and what sells best for me. I had no interest in this lot.

Tiffany Studios Grapevine carriage clock, Toomey lot #391

I tried to buy a very nice Tiffany Studios Grapevine carriage clock, but couldn’t because the price was too high for a clock with damage. Two glass panels were cracked and the door hinge was broken. It sold below it’s aggressive estimate of $4,000 – $6,000, realizing $3,250, including buyer’s premium.

Daum Prairie vase, Toomey lot #475

The best French cameo glass vase in the sale, a Daum Prairie vase did very well. It sold for $20,000, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $5,000 – $7,000. Prairie vases are rare and very desirable, but this example didn’t have the best color and had some minor damage to one of the flowers, apparently from a slight impact somewhere in its history. I would have bid more strongly than I did if the condition were perfect. I was not the buyer.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No shows until Antiques + Modernism Winnetka (IL), November 1-4, 2018. We always look forward to our twice yearly exhibits in the greater Chicago area. But remember we’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. 

I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What is the future of antique shows?

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


Remember the Pier Antique Show in NYC?

What is the future of antique shows? Will they fail or survive? It’s an existential question for antique dealers like myself. We used to exhibit at more than twenty shows per year. Now we’re down to six. Important shows have folded, like the Pier Show in NYC, which I really miss. It’s amazing that we have no show in NYC.

The Baltimore Summer Antiques Show is held in the Baltimore Convention Center

The recent Baltimore Summer Antiques Show was the smallest it’s been in decades, as the attrition rate among dealers is high and increasing. Most antique dealers are in the age range of 60-80, with very few younger dealers coming in to take the places of the older ones retiring or dying. If 50-100 dealers a year drop out of important shows like Baltimore, the shows will reach a critical mass, below which they will fold. Personally I never saw this day coming until I had an inkling about 10 years ago.

Auction houses, on the other hand, are doing brisk business. Many of the baby boomers, who form the majority of collectors, are aging out. Their children consign their estates to auction, many without reserve. Auction houses don’t really care what they’re selling, as long as they’re selling. If items have no reserve, they’re guaranteed to sell and the auction houses are guaranteed to make their commissions.

Morphy Auctions in Denver, PA, is doing a brisk business

I never intended to retire from the antiques business, but the business may retire me. I’m switching tactics and trying my best to do more business from my website. If I could replace the income generated from antique shows with income from my website, I’d be a happy camper. Since a lot of the action has shifted to auctions, I utilize those too.

The future of the antiques business for me is murky. The changes are happening quickly and I’m trying to adjust accordingly. Only time will tell, so keep tuned.


No shows until Antiques + Modernism Winnetka (IL), November 1-4, 2018. We always look forward to our twice yearly exhibits in the greater Chicago area. But remember we’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. 

I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The results of the Baltimore Summer Antiques Show, August 30 – September 2, 2018

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


There were a couple of hundred people at the opening on Thursday

Thursday, 6:50 PM Opening day is almost over. More or less, it’s been like other opening days for me in Baltimore — namely, lots of interest, but very few sales. However, it was a good day because we sold a Tiffany 7-light lily lamp to a new client, plus I made important private sales by email. If history repeats itself, business should be just fine later in the show. That’s my plan, but el hombre propone y Dios dispone.

We sold a Tiffany 7-light lily lamp at the show

Our booth was crowded early on Thursday afternoon

Friday, 3:10 PM The day started off with good attendance and interest, but slowed down dramatically by mid-afternoon. We made one Tiffany vase sale and hope to make another before the day is over. We’ll see.

We sold this lovely Gallé vase at the show

Friday, 6:30 PM A “be-back” (that’s what antique dealers call people who say they’ll be back) came back and purchased a very nice Gallé vase, so the day was decent (except for all the hours of sitting around crawling out of my skin).

Saturday, 2:30 PM Attendance and interest has been good at the start of every day, but the sales haven’t been coming as fast as they should. We sold a small KPM plaque to start the day and nothing since, but I’m optimistic the day will end well.

Saturday, 6:30 PM I was incredibly busy during the day with inquiries. At times I had to speak to several people simultaneously, but it only resulted in a couple of small sales. However, the day ended well, mostly because I made several important sales to my private clients by email. Thank goodness for my private clients.

We sold this beautiful Tiffany Studios Linenfold table lamp at the show

Sunday, 6:30 PM The show is over and I’m very pleased. Attendance was lighter today and there was less interest, but I sold a Tiffany lamp to a new client and a pair of candlesticks to another. Sales to new clients is very important.

Overall we’re quite pleased. Interest and sales in Tiffany lamps and glass were strongest. The show was smaller, but attendance was good, so the dealers benefited. Whatever buying power the public brought was spread over fewer dealers. I did hear a few complaints, but most dealers I spoke to were pleased.

Now we’ll take some time to smell the roses, but we’re always doing business, so keep in touch!


No shows until Antiques + Modernism Winnetka (IL), November 1-4, 2018. We always look forward to our twice yearly exhibits in the greater Chicago area. But remember we’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call.

I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The Baltimore Summer Antiques Show opens to the public this Thursday, August 30, 2018

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


It was busy in my booth last year

Seems like it was just a few months ago that we last exhibited in Baltimore. Time passes in a blink. The much anticipated Baltimore Summer Antiques Show will open to the public this Thursday, August 30th, at noon, and continue until Sunday, September 2nd at 6 PM. I always look forward to this show, especially since there aren’t many great shows left. Many guests travel great distances to visit this show and that includes Europe and Japan. Where else can you see an international selection of the finest antique dealers, all in one location? The show is truly worth a trip from wherever you are. Baltimore has great restaurants, the Inner Harbor, street performers, fine stores, the National Aquarium and of course the best antique show money can buy.

I’ll have this important Louis Tiffany Favrile vase at the show

Personally I’ve been buying and buying since our last show in Chicago in May. I’ll be bringing those items to complement the finest selection of French and American art glass and lamps. It will be the first time the new items will be exhibited for sale.

It’s not too late to make plans. I just looked up a 3-day stay on Hotwire for Baltimore Inner Harbor. There are bargains galore. Excellent hotels were available from $67 to $79/night. The locations are a very short walk to the Baltimore Convention Center, where the show is being held.

You can print this form or click on it

If you’ve never visited the city of Baltimore and especially the show, you’re really missing out. The show is wonderful. You have my personal guarantee. Maybe a couple of free tickets to the show will help you make up your mind. Either print the form above or click on it to redirect you to a form you have to complete. You’ll receive one free ticket to the show, good for two.

Monday’s post will have the results. Tune in again.


We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s new at Philip Chasen Antiques?

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


Important Louis Tiffany Favrile vase

We haven’t exhibited at a show since last May at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. That’s given us plenty of time to search far and wide for the best American and French glass and lamps, with great success.

Here’s a sample of what we’ve recently bought. We’ll bring it all to the Baltimore Summer Antiques Show next week, but it’s all for sale before we get there (hint, hint).

Very rare and beautiful Schneider vase with applied tulip


Rare Gallé vase with a beetle and oak leaves


Very rare Marblehead Pottery vase with herons


One of 15 new Tiffany Grapevine desk set items I recently purchased

I’ve got new items in every category from American glass, pottery, desk sets and lamps to French glass and lamps. Check them out on my website or email me. I’ve got plenty of items I just haven’t had the time to list.

You can print this form or click on it for free tickets for two people

BTW, it’s not too late to make your plans to attend one of the best antique shows in the country. The show opens to the public on Thursday, August 30th, at noon and runs until Sunday, September 2nd, at 6 PM. There are still plenty of high quality, inexpensive rooms. Check out hotwire.com.


We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Sotheby’s stock is down significantly, partly because of two “Mystery” paintings

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Buste de femme de profil by Pablo Picasso. Photo courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Sotheby’s stock (very clever symbol BID on the New York Stock Exchange) is down significantly to $46.99 (as of August 10, 2018) from a recent high of $59.67 on June 8, 2018. Analysts attribute part of the drop to a decline in margin resulting from the sale of two “Mystery” paintings. Art experts have identified the two paintings as a Modigliani sold in New York and a Picasso sold in London. Even though their selling prices were very high, their results hurt the bottom line.

Following is the link to an article from cnbc.com that explains the seeming contradiction. The two mystery paintings that sunk Sotheby’s stock.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only two weeks away, at the end of this month, August 30 – September 2, 2018. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

How can you tell if an etching is authentic?

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


There isn’t much going on in the summer, so I’ve decided to reprint one of my most popular blogs, How can you tell if an etching is authentic?, published originally on 7/29/2009.

Louis Icart pulling a proof of Joy of Life from the etching press

Louis Icart pulling a proof of Joy of Life from the etching press

First one has to understand the process of producing an etching. The artist does his work on a copper plate, so the “original” is a copper plate that’s rarely for sale. To produce the image, the plate first is hand-inked. Then the paper is laid down on top and the two pass together through the etching press, under tremendous pressure. The pressure transfers the image to the paper. Since the copper plate has thickness, it “dents” the paper around the edge of the image. This “dent” is called a plate impression. You can see it and feel it around the edge of the plate. So #1. A real etching has a plate impression.

Since the process is not photographic and there is no printing press, there are no dots in the image. If you use a magnifying glass to look at a photograph in a newspaper, you can see the entire image is made up of dots. Use a magnifying glass with an original etching and there are no dots. So #2. An authentic etching does not have any dots in the image.

An authentic pencil signature of Louis Icart

After the edition is printed by the master printer, it is given back to the artist for hand-signing. Prints or other fakes have copies of the signature. So #3. Authentic etchings are hand-signed by the artist, usually in pencil.

The blindstamp of the Louis Icart Society

In the case of Louis Icart, a raised seal called a blindstamp, was created in mid-1926, and was usually found in the lower left corner, just below the image. Most Icart images produced after this time have the blindstamp, but don’t use this information as a crutch. There are some fake etchings that have fake blindstamps. And conversely, there are many authentic Icart etchings that do not have blindstamps. Supposedly the etchings without blindstamps were not for export from France, but personally I’ve found too many instances where this rule doesn’t pertain. If you’re still not sure, you need a professional appraisal.

Because of this post I have received many requests over the years for authentication of etchings by artists other than Louis Icart. I am only an expert in the works of Louis Icart, not other artists. So please, if you have questions about your etching, don’t send them to me. I really can’t help unless the artist is Louis Icart. And remember, there is a fee of $125 for authentications and/or appraisals.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only four weeks away, at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018. We were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.