The Original Miami Beach Antique Show is over. It was fantastic. It was terrible.

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


I assume you would like an explanation. Fair enough. I sold a phenomenal number of items and did very well. So the show was fantastic. But I didn’t sell these items to the public. I sold them to my own clients via email, texts, photos and phone calls. I only made two sales to the public. If those were the only sales I had made, the show would have been a disaster. So the show was terrible.

Part of our booth at the show

I really had no idea how Covid would affect the show. The answer is that many clients did not come. The best clients are the ones who fly or drive in from wherever. They’re serious clients who make the effort to travel long distances, in some cases. Local people who stroll in from a leisurely drive have very little invested. Many of them are not serious. As a result, attendance was lighter than usual and interest was way down.

Part of our collection of French cameo glass at the show

We gave out lots of business cards — a very bad sign. People take business cards in a disingenuous attempt to leave gracefully. It’s just a ruse, as most of the time they’re not really interested. If that’s the case, they should say so and not ask for a card. One old-timer many years ago told us he doesn’t give out cards for this exact reason. He seemed like a curmudgeon at the time, but insightful in retrospect.

We sold this stupendous Daum Nancy Birch Tree scenic vase at the show

Both of my sales to the public were Daum Nancy. One was a gorgeous Birch Tree scenic vase and the other was a fantastic box with padded and wheel-carved poppies.

Of course I’ll do the show again next year, but my expectations will be different. If Covid is still important in a year, it will continue to have negative consequences. If it fades in importance, I suspect many more people will be willing to make the long distance trip. Got my fingers crossed, not just for me, but for humanity.


Click on the image above to register

No shows until May when we’ll exhibit at the Chicago Antiques + Art + Design show at the Merchandise Mart in downtown Chicago. It’s a beautiful show in a wonderful venue. The dates are May 13-15, 2022, with a preview party on the night of the 12th. So put it on your calendar and make plans to visit. You’ll thank me.


Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The Original Miami Beach Antique Show opens to the public this Thursday, January 20, 2022

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


The Original Miami Beach Antique Show opens to the public this Thursday, January 20, 2022 at 11 AM and closes Sunday, January 23, 2022, at 6:00 PM. It will be our first show in two years, so we’re really excited about it.

Just this week I was able to buy several additional Tiffany Studios lamps, including a 20″ conical, dichroic glass, geometric lamp with fantastic color and mottling. Also a 14″ diameter Turtleback lamp with a great base and a couple of Linenfold lamps. I’ll have a super display of lamps at the show. Unfortunately I had to pack them for the trip to Miami Beach before I could take photos of them, so I have none of the new ones here to show you.

Tiffany Studios 18″ diameter Belted Dogwood table lamp

But I do have a photo of a terrific 18″ diameter Tiffany Studios Belted Dogwood that I’ll have at the show. It’s got great color, super mottling, and a superb Cushion base, all in great condition.

Walter pâte-de-verre Mouse paperweight

I’ll have a nice display of pâte-de-verre glass by Walter and Argy-Rousseau, including the Mouse paperweight pictured above, plus an amazing display of the best Gallé and Daum vases.

We’ll have this killer, monumental Gallé vase at the show

The forecast for this coming week in Miami Beach is 70s all week. Wouldn’t you like to visit a great antique show after two years of no shows and bask in the delightful weather and eat some delicious stone crab? Make it your business to visit and come say hello! We’re in booth 711.


Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A review of some recent sales

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


Business continues to be good. I’m making lots of good sales, but I still miss the shows where I can meet new people.

Important Gallé Bluebird lamp

We thought we would have this wonderful Gallé Bluebird lamp for The Original Miami Beach Antique Show, but it sold to the first person I offered it to.

Tiffany 14″ diameter Belted Dogwood table lamp

I wanted to have an extensive display of Tiffany leaded lamps for the show, but they’re selling faster than I can replace them. I will have a very nice display, with an assortment of about 15 leaded, Linenfold and Favrile glass Tiffany Studios lamps in both table and floor versions. I’m hoping I’ll be able to buy some lamps from other dealers at the show before it opens to the public to add to my selection.

Marvelous A. Walter Chameleon tray

Pâte-de-verre by both Argy-Rousseau and Walter is selling very well. I just sold the Walter Chameleon tray above. Do you have any good pâte-de-verre for sale? I’m paying really good prices, so please offer them to me.


Click here for a link for two free tickets to The Original Miami Beach Antique Show or click the image below.

Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

We’ll be exhibiting at The Original Miami Beach Antique Show, January 20 – 23, 2022

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


The newly renovated Miami Beach Convention Center

We haven’t exhibited at any antique shows since February, 2020, when we were last at the Grove Park Inn in Asheville, NC; the happy idiots. We had heard of a virus in Wuhan, China, but it didn’t have anything to do with us. Right? Within a couple of weeks we were on total lockdown.

Our booth at the last Miami Beach show

We’ve been out and about since we had our three shots, but always with masks at all indoor activities. We shop at stores, we went to a Broadway show, etc., but not indoor restaurants. So with a bit of trepidation, we will exhibit at our first show in almost two years at The Original Miami Beach Antique Show, January 20 – 23, 2022. We’ll wear masks the entire time we’re in the venue and hope that our guests will do so too.

We’ll have this exceptional Gallé Bluebird lamp at the show (unless I sell it first)

Business has been pretty good during the pandemic, so I’ve been busy buying and selling. We have an incredible assortment of wonderful new items for the show. I expect people will still fly in and drive in from afar, but I’m not sure about the attendance. It may be strong as people have been itching to get out and do things, or it may be weak, if people are still afraid. I’ll surely let you know in a future blog.

In the meantime, I’m very much looking forward to going to beautiful, warm Miami, in the middle of the winter, to do business and have some fun. I hope you’ll join me.


Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Strong results at Christie’s New York Tiffany sale, December 10, 2021

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


Christie’s New York held a Tiffany sale on December 10, 2021 that grossed $4,193,250, with only 40 lots for sale. Results were strong, with most items selling at or above (some well above) their high estimates. Only one lot, #220, a Tiffany figural window, failed to sell. Following is a review of some of the more interesting results.

Tiffany Studios Apple Blossom table lamp, Christie’s lot #223

As expected, the top lot of the sale went to #223, a very rare Apple Blossom table lamp in the form of a Wisteria lamp. Only six examples are known to exist, of which three are in museums. The lamp realized $625,000, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $400,000 – $600,000.

Tiffany Studios Favrile lamp with Arch base, Christie’s lot #232

Lot #232 was a very rare and unusual Favrile glass lamp with 7 shades, on an Arch base. It almost doubled its low estimate of $150,000, realizing $300,000, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Studios 20″ diameter Dragonfly table lamp, Christie’s lot #227

I really wanted to buy lot #227, a 20″ diameter Dragonfly lamp with gorgeous dichroic, mottled glass in the background. It sold for $93,750, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $50,000 – $70,000. Unfortunately for me, I was the underbidder (as I was on a number of lots).

I managed not to buy anything because of the strong prices. I take consolation in the fact that the market is strong.

Click here for the complete results of the sale.

Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Excellent results for French glass at Christie’s Design sale, December 9, 2021

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


Christie’s New York held a Design sale on December 9, 2021. Included in the sale was an outstanding group of French glass, consisting of 24 lots of important artistic vases and lamps by Gallé, Daum and others. Only two of the lots did not sell, with the others selling mostly at or above their high estimates.

Following is a review of some of the standout sales.

Daum and Majorelle Nénuphar table lamp, Christie’s lot #107

The top lot of the French glass section of the sale was #107, an Art Nouveau bronze and glass Nénuphar (Water Lily) lamp by Daum (the glass) and Majorelle (the bronze), circa 1900. It sold for many times its high estimate of $30,000, realizing $200,000, including buyer’s premium.

Gallé Wisteria table lamp, Christie’s lot #89

The second highest lot of the French glass section of the sale went to #89, a huge, impressive, 30½” tall, blue and yellow Gallé Wisteria table lamp. It sold within its estimate of $100,000 – $150,000, realizing $162,500, including buyer’s premium.

Gallé Rose of France vase, Christie’s lot #96

I loved lot #96, an important, artistic Gallé Rose of France vase, with molten applied flowers, branches and leaves. I tried to buy it, but it went way into retail territory. It sold for $118,750, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $25,000 – $35,000.

The collection of French glass was exceptional, so I suggest you click here for the complete results of the sale. The sale grossed $13,969,125, so you’ll probably be interested in the other lots in the sale, a few of which exceeded $1,000,000.

Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Good results at Sotheby’s Dreaming in Glass: Masterworks by Tiffany Studios sale, December 8, 2021

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


Sotheby’s New York held a Dreaming in Glass: Masterworks by Tiffany Studios sale on December 8, 2021. The 33 lots sold for a total of $5,386,397, with 100% sold. Following is a review of a few of the more interesting results.

Tiffany Studios 26″ diameter Oriental Poppy floor lamp, Sotheby’s lot #313

As expected the top lot of the sale was lot #313, a gorgeous 26″ diameter Oriental Poppy floor lamp. It sold within its estimate of $600,000 – $800,000, realizing $746,000,including buyer’s premium. Lot #316, a Wisteria lamp, was a close second, realizing $685,500, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Favrile Tel el-Amarna vase, Sotheby’s lot #303

There were more valuable Tiffany Favrile vases in the sale than lot #303, a red Tel el-Amarna vase, but that was my choice. It was a stunning example, both rare and beautiful. I wanted to buy it, but couldn’t see my way to pay the price of $25,200, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $12,000 – $18,000.

Tiffany Studios 20″ diameter Dragonfly table lamp, Sotheby’s lot #333

I also wanted to buy lot #333, a beautiful 20″ Dragonfly with great mottling and jeweled red eyes. It came on a very desirable gold doré Twisted Vine base. I was willing to pay about $80,000, all in, but it sold for $100,800, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $60,000 – $80,000. That was a retail price, which I wouldn’t pay.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

You have to be very careful when buying Tiffany lamps at auction

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


Leland Little Auctions, Hillsborough, NC, held a Signature Winter auction on December 4, 2021. Included in the sale were several lamps; the topic of this blog.

Tiffany Studios 20″ diameter Dragonfly table lamp, Little lot #207

I tried to buy lot #207, a Tiffany Studios 20″ diameter Dragonfly table lamp. Unfortunately I was the underbidder. It realized $44,400, including buyer’s premium. It had some problems: Shade: 2.5 inch solder repair to fitter rim edge; the same area with four cracked glass panels; a few other scattered tight hairline cracks to glass panels; one of the upper green cabochons with chips; the lamp base with a dent to the underside edge of the base (only visible from underneath). Additionally the sockets were pull-chain and should have been turn-key. So the lamp needed about $3,000 to fully restore it.

I recently sold almost the identical lamp for a bit more and my lamp had no problems. So it made no sense to pay a total of approximately $47,500, then do a lot of work, then try to make a small profit.

20″ diameter Peony leaded shade

The next lot, #208, is where the problems started. It was described on their website as follows:

Tiffany Studios “Peony” Stained Glass Shade Circa 1910, wavy textured and pulled glass panes in light green, yellow and rich reds, marked to interior base rim “Tiffany Studios / New York / 1475”.

7.75 x 18.25 in. diameter; fitter rim 4.25 in.

Amongst the firm’s most consistently popular lamp models, the Peony remained in continuous production from its debut around 1900 until the late 1920s.

Good as found condition; no cracks found; rich reddish brown patina to bronze solder; brown residue to interior and exterior of glass.

$20,000 – 40,000

The problem is that it wasn’t by Tiffany Studios, but rather a modern reproduction. Take a look at a closeup of the ripple glass. Note that the waves are random, whereas Tiffany ripple glass has much more orderly ripples. Also note that the shade is described as having brown residue to interior and exterior of glass. That trick was done by immersing the shade in tea and letting it dry. Then look at the signature tag, which was bogus.

I’m fairly sure that Leland Little Auction is a reputable auction house, but without Tiffany experts. Had they hired an outside expert (me, perhaps), the lot would have been listed as Tiffany-style, modern, with an estimate of $2,000 – $3,000. Knowledgeable people didn’t bid, as evidenced by the final price of $30,000, including buyer’s premium. If it were authentic, it would have sold for double or triple that. So that means a novice bought it and is going to be really unhappy when he/she finds out.

Handel-type lamp, Little lot #210

The next lot, #209, had a similar problem. It was sold as Handel, Stained Glass Table Lamp. But it wasn’t; well at least the shade wasn’t (the base was authentic.) In all probability, the shade was a modern reproduction. It’s possible that it was by Unique, a New York lamp maker of the period, but probably not. They used similarly-shaped flowers and background glass, but their shades always had zigzag irregular lower rims. Additionally, the cap on this example was for reverse-painted lamps only. Handel used special openwork caps for their leaded shades.

Again I think knowledgeable buyers did not bid. It sold for only $2,160, including buyer’s premium. It would have sold for well above that price if it had been authentic, as evidenced by some recent sales at other auction houses.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.

Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

I tried to buy some Tiffany lamps, but…

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


William Smith Auctions, Plainfield, NH, held a Fabulous Pre-Thanksgiving Auction on November 20, 2021. It was a diverse sale with a few items that interested me. I tried to buy them, but was outbid on all of them; some by a lot.

Tiffany Studios 12″ diameter Acorn floor lamp, Smith lot #303

First up lot #303, a nice, but not fantastic, Tiffany Studios 12″ diameter Acorn floor lamp. Estimated to sell for $5,000 – $7,000, it realized $17,700, including buyer’s premium. I usually sell this model in the range of $18,000 – $22,000, so there was no way I could pay the price.

Tiffany Studios 22″ diameter geometric shade, Smith lot #305

Then I tried to buy lot #305, a Tiffany Studios 22″ diameter green geometric hanging shade with 10 scattered hairline cracks. It’s possible this was originally a hanging shade, but more likely it was part of a table lamp. I have the correct base to convert it to a table lamp, so I was anxious to buy the shade. I figured after I added the cost of a base (about $5,000), I could sell the lamp for about $20,000+. So I bid $11,800, including the buyer’s premium. That would have put me into the lamp for about $16,800, leaving a little room for a profit. Amazingly, the shade sold for $23,600, including buyer’s premium. Nuts!

Handel 24″ square table lamp, Smith lot #309

I even tried to buy a huge, pretty, 24″ square Handel leaded lamp at the sale, lot #309. I figured Tiffany lamps are so difficult to buy nowadays that I would try for a Handel. It was estimated to sell for $3,000 – $5,000 and realized $12,980. No way could I buy it at that price and make a buck.

So I would up buying nothing at the sale, which seems to be a common theme nowadays. The market is strong, so I have to try harder, which of course I will do.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.

Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Strong results at Cowan’s Early 20th Century Design sale, November 17, 2021

I will do my best to publish a new post every Monday.


Cowan’s Auction (now a Hindman Company), Cincinnati, OH, held an Early 20th Century Design sale on November 17, 2021 with superb results. I tried to buy more than a few items, but was outbid on everything. Sad that I didn’t get anything, but happy that the market is strong.

Tiffany Studios 16″ diameter Bellflower table lamp, Hindman lot #94

One of the top lots of the sale was a Tiffany Studios 16″ diameter Bellflower table lamp. The photo doesn’t do it justice; it was actually redder and prettier in person. But the result of $50,000, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $15,000 – $20,000 shows the strength of the market. That’s about double what the lamp would bring ordinarily.

Tiffany Studios Mermaid table lamp, Hindman lot #91

Lot #91 was a lovely example of Tiffany Studios’ Mermaid table lamp, with a gorgeous original patina, from a sculpture by Louis Gudebrod. This model comes two ways; either with a natural nautilus shell or a leaded glass, shell-shaped shade. Of course the leaded example is more valuable. This example had a damaged shell. It’s possible to replace the shell and sell a perfect lamp with a new shell. I think Mr. Tiffany would approve of such an action. It sold well above its estimate of $5,000 – $7,000, realizing $25,000, including buyer’s premium. Impressive!

Gallé carved and enameled vase, Hindman lot #35
Detail of the signature

Even more impressive was the very strong result obtained by lot #35, an important, hand-carved and enameled vase by Emile Gallé. The vase was engraved underneath La Limnée de nos étangs mé conseillé la forme de ce vase Emile Gallé fecit Nancy, along with Gallé’s initials EG, the Cross of Lorraine, and a tiny image of a snail. It roughly translates to The snail from our ponds suggested the shape of this vase made by Émile Gallé. The marking fecit, from Latin, means that Gallé himself created the vase, but probably did not actually make it. It soared above its estimate of $4,000 – $5,000 realizing an impressive $46,875, including buyer’s premium. Apparently there were at least two bidders who knew the importance of the vase.

Cowan’s got strong results across the board, including Art Nouveau furniture, Tiffany glass and French glass. Jennifer Howe, the department head, deserves credit for putting together a great sale. To see all the results, click here.

Let me know what interests you, even if you don’t see it on my website. I’ve got lots of items that I haven’t listed yet and I know how to locate what you desire.

I listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.