What was so special about a Daum vase I recently sold?

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Daum vase with applied flower

I recently sold a small Daum vase that looked innocuous, but was actually special. Let’s take a look under the hood.

First we have to look at the single flower, whose center was molten applied with blue internal coloration during the making of the vase. After cooling, an artist hand-engraved (wheel-carved) a bumpy texture (martelé) onto the flower center and details into all of the leaves. To complete the vase, the artist carved a martelé texture into the background and the foot rim.

Daum vases with wheel-carving often had hand-engraved signatures, as was the case with this vase. It’s fancy, textbook-perfect, and found on the underside.

The vase wasn’t very flashy or colorful, but it was sophisticated because of the number of difficult techniques employed in its manufacture. That and the high-quality workmanship made it special.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only six weeks away, at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018. We were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Mixed results at Morphy Auctions first Lamps, Glass & Jewelry auction, June 20-21, 2018

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


James D. Julia, Inc., now a division of Morphy Auctions, held a Lamps, Glass & Jewelry auction on June 20-21, 2018 with approximate total sales of $2.8 million. The first day focused on silver and jewelry, with some strong results. The second day was dedicated to glass and lamps, with mixed strong and soft results. Today’s post will only focus on the lamps and glass.

Monumental Gallé Clematis table lamp, Morphy lot #752

The top lot of the entire sale was #752, a magnificent, enormous Emile Gallé Clematis table lamp. It was an example of the largest Gallé lamp known to exist, 31″ tall x 20½” diameter. To make sure the lot sold, the consignor lowered the reserve to half the low estimate of $120,000, or $60,000. I bid $60,000 to open the lot, but then dropped out. The bidding continued long after I was out. The lamp sold for $184,500, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $120,000 – $150,000. It wasn’t too surprising considering another Gallé lamp of the same size and shape, but with Wisteria decoration, sold at Christie’s New York in June of 2017 for $331,500. The consignor at Morphy’s sale was very nervous prior to the sale and ebullient after the sale.

Tiffany Turtleback lantern

The top lot of the Tiffany lamps was a Turtleback lantern, not a table lamp. It sold as lot #802 for $67,650, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $25,000 – $35,000.

Thomas Webb & Sons Alligator perfume bottle, Morphy lot #909

The most unexpected result of the sale was for lot #909, a rare glass alligator perfume bottle in its original box. Bidding started online at $400 and continued for 77 bids until it was finally sold in the auction room for the astonishing price of $67,200, against a pre-sale estimate of $800 – $1,500. Apparently it was a very rare bottle by Thomas Webb & Sons, pictured in some obscure literature, but never seen in person. The sale was winding down after selling over 900 lots when the excitement started. It sold just a few lots short of the end of the sale at lot #926. Nobody in the room was expecting that kind of action so late in the sale. Morphy’s didn’t know what they had, so they just catalogued it as a rare alligator bottle, with no known attribution. At least two bidders knew what it was and that’s all it took for a fantastic result.

For the complete results of both days of the sale, click here.


No shows until the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018, as we were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Strong results for Tiffany Studios’ items at Julia’s Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry auction, December 1, 2017

Monday’s post will be up by noon.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Sorry for the temporary outage on my website and blog yesterday, January 17, 2018. There were some technical problems that were resolved, so everything should be up and running just fine now.

James D. Julia, Inc., held a Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry sale on December 1, 2017, with total sales over $2,500,000. The results were relatively strong for the entire sale, but especially strong for Tiffany Studios’ glass and lamps. 16 of the 17 highest priced lots were Tiffany Studios’ lamps — impressive, considering there were 739 lots in the sale.

Rare Tiffany Butterfly table lamp, Julia’s lot #1473

The top lots of the sale, #s 1428, 1473, and 1516, were all Tiffany Studios’ lamps that each sold for the identical price of $84,700, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Treasure Chest inkwell, Julia’s lot #1453

A rare and very desirable Tiffany Treasure Chest inkwell, lot #1453, sold for approximately twice its high estimate of $7,000, realizing $17,545, including buyer’s premium.

Rare Gallé Butterfly vase, Julia’s lot #1115

The top lot of the French cameo glass portion of the sale was #1115, a rare wheel-carved Gallé Butterfly vase. It was an interesting vase, technically very sophisticated, but not as eye-appealing as it could have been with muted colors and no decoration between the butterflies. It sold just below its low estimate of $18,000, realizing $19,360, including buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here. You will have to sign in (free) to see the prices.


The Miami shows are only two weeks away, with the first on February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. I’ve been beating the bushes finding new treasures and have come up with some beauties. I just listed over 18 new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look.

I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Art & Antiques Magazine published a very interesting article on Daum Nancy glass

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Fine Daum Nancy Mushroom vase

Sheila Gibson Stoodley approached me for an article she was writing for the November, 2017, issue of Art & Antiques Magazine. I was glad to help with discussions and photographs. Click here to read it. I think you’ll enjoy it.

Then if you’re inspired, click Chasen Antiques’ Daum vases to view some of the Daum Nancy selection I have for sale.

Thursday’s post will be about the very strong sale of Tiffany Studios lamps and objects at Sotheby’s New York. You won’t want to miss it.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. I’ve been beating the bushes finding new treasures and have come up with some beauties. I just listed over 18 new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look.

I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Unfortunately I missed Doyle Auction’s Doyle + Design sale, November 21, 2017

We’re back from vacation, so I’ll begin posting new blogs twice weekly, starting Monday, Christmas Day. It will be a good one on an important and unexpected merger in the auction business. You won’t want to miss it.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.

November 21, 2017 was a busy day for auctions, with four auction houses holding simultaneous sales, including Leslie Hindman, Bonham’s LA, Heritage and Doyle New York. I had catalogs from all of them, but I was (and still am) so busy I didn’t realize it until the sales were over. I did manage to buy some nice items at two of the sales, but I should have paid more attention to the sale at Doyle’s. It was a disaster for them, but a gold mine for buyers.

Daum Nancy floral vase, Doyle lot #169

Lot 168 was a beautiful 11″ Daum Nancy vase, estimated to sell for $2,000 – $4,000 — a fair, but low estimate. The vase actually sold for $1,250, including buyer’s premium. It’s a vase that I could have easily sold in the $6,000 – $8,000 price range. Ouch! That hurts.

Handel floor lamp with Tiffany 10″ Favrile shade, Doyle lot #174

Lot #174 was more of a dealer lot. By that I mean it was a marriage of a 10″ Tiffany Favrile shade and a Handel base that a lamp dealer could make into two proper lamps. Namely you would need a suitable Tiffany Studios base for the shade and a 10″ Handel or Steuben shade for the base. It sold for the low estimate of $3,000 ($3,750 including buyer’s premium). It wasn’t the greatest of lamps, but it was well worth the money, especially to a dealer.

French marquetry game table, Doyle lot #170

One more example was lot # 170, a beautiful French hand-carved and marquetry game table. It sold for only $1,875, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-auction estimate of $3,000 – $5,000.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. That gives us time to beat the bushes to find new treasures and take some time to smell the figurative roses. November is usually a good month for business. Then business dies in December because most people are looking for less expensive Christmas gifts than we offer. Occasionally we make a Christmas sale, but that’s the exception, not the rule. Cold weather and the New Year bring a new wave of enthusiasm.

I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Leslie Hindman sold the Estate of Robert Smith in its Modern Design sale, 11/14/17

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Chicago, IL, held their Modern Design sale on 11/14/17. Included in the sale was the Estate of Robert Smith, which consisted mostly of French cameo glass. Don Williams was Robert’s main source for glass, until Don passed away a few years ago. Then Robert turned to me to continue collecting. He passed away last year from a rare form of bone cancer.

Daum Nancy Alpine vase, Hindman lot #467

I was anxious to buy back some of the glass that I’d sold to him, especially lot #467, a beautiful and rare Daum Nancy Alpine scenic vase, but it eluded me. It sold for $12,500, against an estimate of $4,000 – $6,000. I was the underbidder. The buyer who bought it paid a fair price, but it was just beyond what a dealer can pay and still make a fair return on his investment.

B&S vase, Hindman lot #468

Robert’s collection included more than a few fine examples of internally decorated Burgun & Schverer (B&S) vases. I was successful in purchasing a couple of them. The top result of the group went to lot #468, probably because collectors appreciated the rare shape. It sold for $8,125, against an estimate of $4,000 – $6,000.

B&S Orchids vase, Hindman lot #472

Lot #472 was beautiful and sold for a song, because of a major flaw on the backside, original to the making. It sold for $2,750 against an estimate of $2,000 – $4,000. I wasn’t going to buy it at any price, but the collector who did, bought an impressive vase at a very low price.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. That gives us time to beat the bushes to find new treasures and take some time to smell the figurative roses. November is usually a good month for business. Then business dies in December because most people are looking for less expensive Christmas gifts than we offer. Occasionally we make a Christmas sale, but that’s the exception, not the rule. Cold weather and the New Year bring a new wave of enthusiasm.

I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A few French cameo glass results from recent auctions

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. Now that the weather is colder, I have gone back to publishing twice weekly, as often as possible.


Gallé Tulip vase, Treadway Toomey lot #113

Treadway Toomey Auctions of Chicago, IL, held their Art In Glass: Collection of Joan & Milton Baxt sale on Saturday, November 11, 2017. Included in the sale was one fine lot of Gallé glass, with provenance from Minna Rosenblatt Ltd., New York City, August 2, 1986. With four layers of colored glass on a salmon background, great detail, and a nice 15″ size, it was much better than most Gallé vases that have come up for auction recently. The multiple layers allowed for an unusual effect, with tulips on the back looking like the negative of those on the front. Couple fine quality, market freshness and a low estimate of $2,000 – $4,000 and you’ve got the recipe for a great result. The vase sold for $15,000, including buyer’s premium. I tried to buy it, but it flew past my price to a full retail price.

Gallé Moth vase, Humler & Nolan lot #0572

Humler & Nolan of Cincinnati, OH, held a pottery, glass and Rookwood auction on November 4-5, 2017. Included in the glass section of the sale were a few good items, along with more than a few ordinary items. Lot #0572 was a small (3¾” tall x 4½” long), but very high quality, Gallé vase with wheel-carved moths. Wheel-carving by hand yields a level of detail that is not attainable with acid-etching only. When done by a skilled craftsman, the result can be wonderful. This example was no exception, with great artistry, on a very rare shape. Collectors were willing to overlook the small size and bid the vase to $13,310, against an estimate of $2,500 – $3,000. I, on the other hand, was unable to buy it at a price where I thought I could resell it.

Daum Nancy Cornflower pitcher, Humler & Nolan lot #0622

Lot #0622 was a nice, but unspectacular, Daum Nancy pitcher with Cornflower decoration. Estimated near retail value, $5,000 – $7,000, it sold for the low estimate, $6,050, including buyer’s premium. I had no interest in this item and did not bid.

For the complete results of the Treadway Toomey sale, click here. For the complete results of the Humler & Nolan sale, click here.


No more shows until February 2, 2018, when we’ll exhibit at the Miami Airport show. That gives us time to beat the bushes to find new treasures and take some time to smell the figurative roses. November is usually a good month for business. Then business dies in December because most people are looking for less expensive Christmas gifts than we offer. Occasionally we make a Christmas sale, but that’s the exception, not the rule. Cold weather and the New Year bring a new wave of enthusiasm.

I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The results of the Denver World Wide Antique Show, October 20-22, 2017

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. The weather is getting colder and my show schedule is picking up, so I will try to publish twice weekly again. If readership picks up, I will continue to publish twice weekly, as often as possible.


I’m starting on Friday to write a contemporaneous account for Monday’s blog.

There were a fair number of people in my booth on Friday morning

Friday, 3 PM: The show is off to a very slow start. There have been a fair number of people, but only a few inquiries, mostly not serious. No sales yet, not even close.

One of the dealers told me that important clients will be coming to the show. I know them, since they bought from us the first time we exhibited in Denver several years ago. Hopefully they’ll come.

Friday, 6 PM: The first day is over and I’m hopeful. We made one small sale, but we also have a client who is contemplating a major Tiffany lamp purchase. Got my fingers crossed that’s going to happen.

Part of the Gallé glass we had on exhibit at the show

Saturday, 3:30 PM: Interesting day. The wealthy couple who was going to come to the show are here, but so far have completely ignored my booth. Didn’t think it would go that way. Another client is here who is also seriously interested in the same Tiffany lamp as yesterday, but neither has pulled the trigger. We did make one decent sale earlier, but that’s it. The total thus far is two sales, not nearly enough for a decent show. That could turn around in an instant. I’m still cautiously optimistic.

Sunday, 12:00 PM: We made another sale yesterday afternoon, so we’re up to three. The problem is that the totals are insufficient to make it worthwhile to travel from New York. At this point, we might be close to breaking even. Whoop dee do.

My best prospect for selling an important Tiffany lamp has demurred. My second best prospect is highly unlikely to purchase it. And the wealthy couple who came to the show never even said hello, let alone step foot into our booth. So as of this moment, we’re finished with Denver. But that’s subject to change. We’ll see what happens by the end of the day.

We sold this lovely Amphora portrait vase at the show

Sunday, 4:00 PM: The show is over and the verdict is in. We made one additional small sale today, but the total was only good enough for a local show, not for a long-distance show. Oh well. We like the show and would have loved to return, but business is business. Hasta la vista, Denver.

Print the coupon above for a $2 discount on admission

Now we’re off to Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll travel to Winnetka, Illinois the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to it.

I hope to be able to add a number of wonderful examples of recent purchases to my website, but I’ve been busy, so it’s been hard to find the time. If you’re looking for something, send me an email. I’ll make the time to respond to your request.


I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Setting up at the Denver World Wide Antique Show, October 18, 2017

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. The weather is getting colder and my show schedule is picking up, so I will try to publish twice weekly again. If readership picks up, I will continue to publish twice weekly, as often as possible.


October 20-22, 2017

Yesterday was the first day of setting up at the Denver World Wide Antique Show. We have a nice large booth, in the center of the show, allowing the setup to go as smoothly as possible. We finished about three-quarters of the work and will finish the rest today.

Part of the enormous amount of furniture offered at the show

In asking around, I was told that the October Denver show was the best of the three Denver shows, so there will be no excuses. If we can’t do well in Denver in October, then Denver is not a city for us. Tune in Monday for the results.

One of the fine dealers at the show

The show is larger than the summer version and looks like it will be enjoyable for the public. There’s a large variety of dealers and merchandise from jewelry to paintings to furniture to glass and lamps. (I’m not the only glass dealer in the show, even though I have the most and the best.)

Part of our huge selection of Daum and Gallé at the show

We have a great selection of American and French glass and lamps, including Tiffany, Handel, Daum Nancy and Gallé, to mention a few. Come visit the show and consider making a purchase, especially if you would like us to return.

Print the coupon above for a $2 discount on admission

Next week we’ll travel to Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll travel to Winnetka, Illinois the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to it.

I hope to be able to add a number of wonderful examples of recent purchases to my website, but I’ve been busy, so it’s been hard to find the time. If you’re looking for something, send me an email. I’ll make the time to respond to your request.


I will update my site as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Some recent Daum Nancy French cameo glass purchases and sales

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, readership slows down in the summer, so I will only publish on Mondays until the weather gets cold and readership picks up.


The French cameo glass market has been strong for many years. Daum Nancy glass, in particular, has excelled. Recently I’ve had the opportunity to both buy and sell some exceptional examples. Following are a few.

Daum Nancy scenic tumbler with exceptional color and detail

Daum Nancy tumblers come in three sizes, miniature (about 2″), mini (about 3½”), and standard (about 4¾”). They also vary in shape from round to square to pinched diamond. All of them are quite popular among collectors. In the largest size, floral examples are the most common, with scenic examples moderately rare. So it was especially nice when I was presented with the opportunity to buy a fairly rare, and exceptionally pretty scenic example. I sold it before I could even list it in inventory or on my website. A client sent me an email inquiring about what I had that was small, new and pretty. This tumbler fit the bill, so out the door it went.

Daum Nancy vase with applied moth

By the 1920s, Daum was changing its style to the new Art Deco movement. They started producing some vases with no acid-etching, but rather with applications that were hand-engraved by wheel-carving. The example pictured above is exceptional, with an applied moth whose body looks like a seashell, and elaborately carved wings and martelé background in the body of the vase. This vase was also sold immediately when I sent photos to my best client. No surprise there.

The following two examples haven’t yet been listed on my website, but I am sending photos to a good client. They may be available by the time you read this blog or they may be sold. Please inquire if you have any interest.

Beautiful Daum Nancy scenic vase

The first is a particularly beautiful scenic vase, in a rare shape, with a square mouth, 5″ tall. The color and detail are extraordinary, especially the red in the foreground.

Dazzling Daum Nancy Fall scenic pillow vase

The second example is a Fall scenic, one of my favorite seasons, both in real life and as pictured on Daum Nancy vases. This is the second example I have of this vase, with the same season, size and shape. I’m partial to this example. The colors and detail are quite beautiful and different than usual. The greenish arc in the background is internal, giving the vase great depth. It’s also more transparent than usual, adding to the effect. It’s a stunning example.

I hope to be able to add a number of wonderful examples of recent purchases to my website, but I’ve been so busy, it’s been hard to find the time. If you’re looking for something, send me an email. I’ll make the time to respond to your request.


October 20-22, 2017

Our next show, in Denver, October 20-22, 2017, is fast approaching. We’re giving Denver one last shot to prove it’s worthwhile traveling all the way from New York. If the show doesn’t go well, goodbye Denver. The following week we’ll be in Southfield, Michigan, for the Southfield Pavilion Antiques, Art, & Modernism Show. That’s another show that has to go well for us to return. Then we’ll be in Winnetka, Illinois, the following week for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show. That’s one show we don’t have to worry about. We have great clients in the greater Chicago area, so we really look forward to seeing our old friends.

Click Philip Chasen’s new items to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I recently added several new items and I’ll be adding more this week. They’re some of the best items I’ve ever had, so please take a look.

I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.