What’s new at Philip Chasen Antiques?

I am now publishing once a week, on Monday.


Important Louis Tiffany Favrile vase

We haven’t exhibited at a show since last May at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. That’s given us plenty of time to search far and wide for the best American and French glass and lamps, with great success.

Here’s a sample of what we’ve recently bought. We’ll bring it all to the Baltimore Summer Antiques Show next week, but it’s all for sale before we get there (hint, hint).

Very rare and beautiful Schneider vase with applied tulip


Rare Gallé vase with a beetle and oak leaves


Very rare Marblehead Pottery vase with herons


One of 15 new Tiffany Grapevine desk set items I recently purchased

I’ve got new items in every category from American glass, pottery, desk sets and lamps to French glass and lamps. Check them out on my website or email me. I’ve got plenty of items I just haven’t had the time to list.

You can print this form or click on it for free tickets for two people

BTW, it’s not too late to make your plans to attend one of the best antique shows in the country. The show opens to the public on Thursday, August 30th, at noon and runs until Sunday, September 2nd, at 6 PM. There are still plenty of high quality, inexpensive rooms. Check out hotwire.com.


We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Sotheby’s stock is down significantly, partly because of two “Mystery” paintings

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Buste de femme de profil by Pablo Picasso. Photo courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Sotheby’s stock (very clever symbol BID on the New York Stock Exchange) is down significantly to $46.99 (as of August 10, 2018) from a recent high of $59.67 on June 8, 2018. Analysts attribute part of the drop to a decline in margin resulting from the sale of two “Mystery” paintings. Art experts have identified the two paintings as a Modigliani sold in New York and a Picasso sold in London. Even though their selling prices were very high, their results hurt the bottom line.

Following is the link to an article from cnbc.com that explains the seeming contradiction. The two mystery paintings that sunk Sotheby’s stock.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only two weeks away, at the end of this month, August 30 – September 2, 2018. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Add this new type of Daum Nancy reproduction to your list

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


In my duties as the paid glass and lamps expert for several major auction houses, I’m regularly asked to review items for potential sale at auction. This past week I reviewed an interesting vase.

Most reproduction vases are low enough quality that it takes me a millisecond to identify them. The example above took a few seconds, as the quality of some reproduction vases is improving.

Let’s take a closer look, as there are no instant giveaways that an untrained eye would notice. The most obvious is the top rim, which rarely has a ring of colored glass and seldom is ground flat (but there are plenty of exceptions to that rule).

This vase is authentic

Next let’s move to the martelé wheel-carving in the background. It’s very uneven and carved too deeply into the background color. Pictured above is an example of martelé carving on authentic Daum vase. It’s more even and more subtle.

Notice the center of the flower is acid-etched and appears hollow. Daum didn’t do that.

The signature is bad, but that would be very tough for an amateur to tell. In this example, notice the A in Daum is modern (and different from the A in Nancy) and the M has a curved trough at the end. They’re just wrong.

Lastly is the color scheme, which is close, but off. That observation would take a trained eye.

I’m curious whether reproductions of this type are coming from Romania. Most of the Gallé and Daum reproduction glass is Romanian. Let me know if you know.

If you still can’t tell if your vase is authentic, I am available for authentications/appraisals. My fee is $125 for the first item and $75 for each additional.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only three weeks away, at the end of this month, August 30 – September 2, 2018. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

How can you tell if an etching is authentic?

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


There isn’t much going on in the summer, so I’ve decided to reprint one of my most popular blogs, How can you tell if an etching is authentic?, published originally on 7/29/2009.

Louis Icart pulling a proof of Joy of Life from the etching press

Louis Icart pulling a proof of Joy of Life from the etching press

First one has to understand the process of producing an etching. The artist does his work on a copper plate, so the “original” is a copper plate that’s rarely for sale. To produce the image, the plate first is hand-inked. Then the paper is laid down on top and the two pass together through the etching press, under tremendous pressure. The pressure transfers the image to the paper. Since the copper plate has thickness, it “dents” the paper around the edge of the image. This “dent” is called a plate impression. You can see it and feel it around the edge of the plate. So #1. A real etching has a plate impression.

Since the process is not photographic and there is no printing press, there are no dots in the image. If you use a magnifying glass to look at a photograph in a newspaper, you can see the entire image is made up of dots. Use a magnifying glass with an original etching and there are no dots. So #2. An authentic etching does not have any dots in the image.

An authentic pencil signature of Louis Icart

After the edition is printed by the master printer, it is given back to the artist for hand-signing. Prints or other fakes have copies of the signature. So #3. Authentic etchings are hand-signed by the artist, usually in pencil.

The blindstamp of the Louis Icart Society

In the case of Louis Icart, a raised seal called a blindstamp, was created in mid-1926, and was usually found in the lower left corner, just below the image. Most Icart images produced after this time have the blindstamp, but don’t use this information as a crutch. There are some fake etchings that have fake blindstamps. And conversely, there are many authentic Icart etchings that do not have blindstamps. Supposedly the etchings without blindstamps were not for export from France, but personally I’ve found too many instances where this rule doesn’t pertain. If you’re still not sure, you need a professional appraisal.

Because of this post I have received many requests over the years for authentication of etchings by artists other than Louis Icart. I am only an expert in the works of Louis Icart, not other artists. So please, if you have questions about your etching, don’t send them to me. I really can’t help unless the artist is Louis Icart. And remember, there is a fee of $125 for authentications and/or appraisals.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only four weeks away, at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018. We were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A funny thing happened at Sloans & Kenyon’s July Estate Catalogue auction, July 21, 2018

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Sloans & Kenyon, Chevy Chase, Maryland, held a July Estate Catalogue auction this past weekend, July 20-21, 2018. Included in the sale were several very nice Tiffany Favrile vases that for some strange reason were catalogued as follows “This vase is not being sold as authentic Tiffany.” I called to find out why and was told by the house expert that she had shown the vases to several dealers and they had their doubts about their authenticity. But guess what? They didn’t ask me. The vases were 100% authentic, so I was able to buy them for relatively bargain prices.

Tiffany Favrile vase, Sloans & Kenyon lot #1199

Lot #1199 was sold with an estimate of $100 – $200, a ridiculously low estimate for a 10″ authentic Tiffany Favrile vase, but not a reproduction, as Sloans & Kenyon assumed. I was the winning bidder with a bid of $478, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Favrile decorated vase, Sloans & Kenyon lot #1200

The next lot, #1200, was an even better deal. At 14¾”, it had an elegant shape with beautiful decoration. It too had a very low estimate of $200 – $250. I bought it for $836.50, including buyer’s premium. Bargain #2.

The third lot was a lovely 19½” Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase. I already had a beautiful example for sale, but at the right price I needed a second one. $5,975 was the right price, so I bought it too.

Tiffany Favrile Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase, Sloans & Kenyon lot #1201

All of the vases are for sale. You can buy them all at very fair prices.

And a note to Sloans & Kenyon. My services are available to authenticate and appraise glass and lamps. I already am the paid consultant to several major auction houses.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only five weeks away, at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018. We were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What was so special about a Daum vase I recently sold?

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Daum vase with applied flower

I recently sold a small Daum vase that looked innocuous, but was actually special. Let’s take a look under the hood.

First we have to look at the single flower, whose center was molten applied with blue internal coloration during the making of the vase. After cooling, an artist hand-engraved (wheel-carved) a bumpy texture (martelé) onto the flower center and details into all of the leaves. To complete the vase, the artist carved a martelé texture into the background and the foot rim.

Daum vases with wheel-carving often had hand-engraved signatures, as was the case with this vase. It’s fancy, textbook-perfect, and found on the underside.

The vase wasn’t very flashy or colorful, but it was sophisticated because of the number of difficult techniques employed in its manufacture. That and the high-quality workmanship made it special.


The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is now only six weeks away, at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018. We were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A Tiffany Studios lantern was sold on eBay for $12,323 on May 9, 2018

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Tiffany Studios Turtleback Tile lantern, eBay #302721920597

On May 9, 2018, a Tiffany Turtleback Tile lantern that started at 99¢ sold for $12,323 on eBay? What’s up with that? Let’s start from the beginning.

The title for the sale of item #302721920597, Rare Tiffany Studios Favrile Glass Turtleback Tile Arts & Crafts Lantern Lamp, was accurate. If you were knowledgeable, you would know that. But there are so many reproductions and bogus items for sale on eBay that if you weren’t an expert, you were taking your life into your own hands. I knew it was correct, so I bid up to $8,650 — not enough to win the item.

It had a few problems. 1. It wasn’t signed (but lanterns like this are never signed). 2. The glass in the lower door panel was cracked. 3. The original socket was missing. 4. The chain and ceiling cap were missing. 5. The turtlebacks were gold (green are more desirable). These are all problems that a Tiffany dealer could solve, but not most individuals.

This Tiffany Turtleback Tile lantern sold at Sotheby’s in December, 2016

A similar lantern was sold at auction in NYC at Sotheby’s on December 14, 2016, for $20,000, including buyer’s premium. That green example had no problems.

All you need for a successful auction is two bidders. This item had 24 bids from several bidders. After my bid of $8,650, the bidding jumped in the final minute to $12,223 and then the final bid of $12,323. That’s a technique that smart eBay bidders use to avoid a reply bid. Time runs out and the auction is over. That’s contrary to the ethos of standard auctions which continue the bidding until the last man standing is the highest bidder. Some electronic auctions extend the bidding by a few minutes if there is bidding at the end, but not eBay. They are set in their ways. I suggested to them years ago to change their format, but they weren’t interested. I think there should be an option for sellers to allow extending the auction if there is bidding in the last five minutes. There is no downside for either eBay or the seller, only upside. Auctions should go to the highest bidder, not the one with the fastest trigger finger.

So did the buyer on eBay get the lantern at a good price? I think so, especially if the buyer can take care of its problems. And now you know the rest of the story. (Read that last sentence slowly and with emphasis, as Paul Harvey did in his national radio broadcast.)


No shows until the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018, as we were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

St. Maarten is recovering nicely from Hurricane Irma

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


This limousine was totaled by the hurricane

Every once in a while, my post is about travel. Today’s post concerns St. Maarten, a beautiful half Dutch, half French island in the Caribbean. On September 6, 2017, Hurricane Irma, a category 5 hurricane, with sustained winds of 185 mph or greater, quickly passed over the island, leaving near total devastation. My wife and I visited the island last month. Tourism is the lifeblood of the island, so we went to do our part and see the reconstruction with our own eyes.

The airport terminal is closed during reconstruction

The almost new, $100 million airport, sustained considerable damage to its roof. I heard rumors that rather than cover the roof with tarps to stop the rain, supervisors ordered no tarps, so a bigger insurance check would come. As a result, the water infiltration led to extensive mold growth, forcing the closing of the terminal. It will take $75 million to restore the $100 million terminal. In the meantime, temporary tents were erected to handle visitors.

Divi Little Bay Beach Resort

To our eyes, the island has made remarkable progress. Many roofs have been repaired, making the buildings habitable again. The Divi Little Bay Beach Resort was opened to visitors last month, at the beginning of May. 25% of the resort was ready for guests, with construction continuing at a brisk pace on the remaining 75%. It will be substantially ready for business this coming winter season.

That’s me on the left, Chef Dino Jagtiani in the middle and my lovely wife, Lia on the right

Many of our favorite restaurants were closed, due to their destruction. Chef Dino Jagtiani lost his restaurant, Temptation, in the storm, but he is now the executive chef at a new restaurant, Emilio’s, our new favorite. We had several fantastic meals there. Other favorite restaurants, like Le Santal and Mr. Busby, were destroyed. Tropicana, at the marina in Marigot, survived, but was only open for lunch.

The Grand Casino in Maho Beach is being rebuilt

The beaches all survived, except for Dream Beach. The water is still as clear, clean and beautiful as it always was. It’s a wonderful island that can use your tourist dollars. You’ll have a great time and participate in the island’s recovery.


No shows until the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018, as we were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Mixed results at Morphy Auctions first Lamps, Glass & Jewelry auction, June 20-21, 2018

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


James D. Julia, Inc., now a division of Morphy Auctions, held a Lamps, Glass & Jewelry auction on June 20-21, 2018 with approximate total sales of $2.8 million. The first day focused on silver and jewelry, with some strong results. The second day was dedicated to glass and lamps, with mixed strong and soft results. Today’s post will only focus on the lamps and glass.

Monumental Gallé Clematis table lamp, Morphy lot #752

The top lot of the entire sale was #752, a magnificent, enormous Emile Gallé Clematis table lamp. It was an example of the largest Gallé lamp known to exist, 31″ tall x 20½” diameter. To make sure the lot sold, the consignor lowered the reserve to half the low estimate of $120,000, or $60,000. I bid $60,000 to open the lot, but then dropped out. The bidding continued long after I was out. The lamp sold for $184,500, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $120,000 – $150,000. It wasn’t too surprising considering another Gallé lamp of the same size and shape, but with Wisteria decoration, sold at Christie’s New York in June of 2017 for $331,500. The consignor at Morphy’s sale was very nervous prior to the sale and ebullient after the sale.

Tiffany Turtleback lantern

The top lot of the Tiffany lamps was a Turtleback lantern, not a table lamp. It sold as lot #802 for $67,650, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $25,000 – $35,000.

Thomas Webb & Sons Alligator perfume bottle, Morphy lot #909

The most unexpected result of the sale was for lot #909, a rare glass alligator perfume bottle in its original box. Bidding started online at $400 and continued for 77 bids until it was finally sold in the auction room for the astonishing price of $67,200, against a pre-sale estimate of $800 – $1,500. Apparently it was a very rare bottle by Thomas Webb & Sons, pictured in some obscure literature, but never seen in person. The sale was winding down after selling over 900 lots when the excitement started. It sold just a few lots short of the end of the sale at lot #926. Nobody in the room was expecting that kind of action so late in the sale. Morphy’s didn’t know what they had, so they just catalogued it as a rare alligator bottle, with no known attribution. At least two bidders knew what it was and that’s all it took for a fantastic result.

For the complete results of both days of the sale, click here.


No shows until the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018, as we were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Good results for some Tiffany Studios lamps at Sotheby’s New York Important Design sale, May 24, 2018

For the foreseeable future, I will publish once a week on Monday.


Sotheby’s New York held an Important Design auction on May 24, 2018 with total sales of $13,663,250. Included in the sale were 45 lots of glass, candlesticks and lamps by Tiffany Studios — the topic of today’s post. Results were mixed with unexpectedly high prices for some items and low prices for others.

Tifffany Elaborate Peony table lamp, Sotheby’s lot #311

Lot #311, a magnificent Elaborate Peony, was the top lot of the Tiffany selection. It sold for $735,000, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $400,000 — $600,000. Seemingly this was a good result, but I suspect it would have done much better if the lamp had been sold in the previous December sale where prices were smoking for lamps of this quality.

Tiffany 12-light lily floor lamp, Sotheby’s lot #323

Lot #323 was not a fine example of a Tiffany 12-light lily floor lamp. The finish was bronze doré, in fair condition — not as nice or as desirable as the patina finish. Additionally the lily shades were assembled and not a very good match. It brought the astonishing price of $137,500, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $30,000 – $50,000. Apparently lily lamps have become hot items of late, including lot #306, a 7-light lily table lamp, which sold for the equally astonishing price of $37,500.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No shows until the Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the end of the summer, August 30 – September 2, 2018, as we were forced to give up shows like Denver. Unfortunately the Baltimore show promoter has moved the show one week later than usual, to the Labor Day weekend. The show used to be held over the Labor Day weekend, but that was many years ago. The show is wonderful, so we’ll continue to exhibit there regardless of the change of dates.

We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I recently listed some of the new items on my website and will list more every week. Click Philip Chasen Antiques to take a look. I will make every effort to actively list new items as often as time permits. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.