I’m happy because I didn’t buy much at auction this past weekend

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


I bid at five auctions this past weekend hoping to buy a few items at reasonable prices. I’m happy to report that prices were strong, so I bought almost nothing. Happy, because if prices are strong, the market is good, and I love a good market.

Martin Brothers musicians, Leland Little lot #373

Martin Brothers musicians, Leland Little lot #373

One lot was #373 at Leland Little’s Fall Catalogue Auction in Hillsborough, NC, on Saturday, September 12, 2015. Three Martin Brothers stoneware musicians (two in perfect condition, one restored) were estimated to sell for $2,000 – $4,000, but sold well beyond my budget, for $8,850, including buyer’s premium. For the complete results of the sale, click here.

Joseph Frances Kernan, Rago lot #2715

Joseph Frances Kernan, Rago lot #2715

The day before, I got a bigger surprise at Rago’s Great Estates auction, Friday, September 11, 2015. I noticed a couple of interesting American Illustration paintings in the manner of Norman Rockwell. Both were by Joseph Francis Kernan, an artist I didn’t know very well, but whose work I admired. Lot #2714 carried a pre-sale estimate of $1,500 – $2,000 and sold for $11,875 after serious competitive bidding from two phone bidders. The same two bid the next lot, #2715, to $17,500, against a pre-sale estimate of $3,000 – $5,000. I was hoping to buy them at or below the low estimates. Goes to show you what I know.

Newcomb College scenic vase, Brunk lot #313

Newcomb College scenic vase, Brunk lot #313

Brunk Auctions may or may not have sold a lovely, large (10¾”) Newcomb College vase for $9,600, including buyer’s premium. I say may or may not because I really don’t know. The pre-sale estimate was $4,000 – $8,000. Auction houses never permit reserves higher than the low estimates, so once the bidding reaches the low estimate, an item is supposed to be sold. The hammer price reached $8,000, so it certainly appeared to have sold, but it’s listed on liveauctioneers as “Lot passed. No bid history.” I assume there’s a good explanation, but as of the publication of this blog post, I don’t know it. I wrote directly to Andrew Brunk, the owner of Brunk Auctions, and he responded that he didn’t know of the problem. It was his understanding that the vase sold at auction for $9,600.

In the meantime, I’ll keep plugging away and get my fair share. Luckily I also have private sources for my goodies, so I hope to be outbid at every auction.


nyc-big-flea-9-2015Our next show will be The Big Flea Market at Pier 94 in New York City, September 26-27. Last year was the first time for this show and it was good. The attendees were completely different than the established Pier Antique Show that takes place in November and March each year, making it a totally different experience.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

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