Some incredible prices at Rago’s 20th/21st Century Design Auction, October 26-27, 2012

Monday’s blog will be posted by 1 PM.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

First I’d like to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! It’s a wonderful holiday, so enjoy it with your family and friends.

Superb Frederick Hurten Rhead peacock tile, Rago lot #542

David Rago held a 20th/21st Century Design Auction on October 26-27, 2012, with some results for the history books. Most incredible of all was a Frederick Hurten Rhead four-part tile panel, 20¾” sq., given as a personal gift to Levi Burgess of the Weller Pottery. Estimated to sell for $35,000 – $45,000, it soared to $637,500. A hit-the-jackpot price for the consignor and a record for ANY piece of American Arts and Crafts at auction, ever.

A superb Tiffany Favrile wheel-carved floriform vase, Rago lot #932

A wonderful Tiffany Studios Favrile glass, wheel-carved, floriform vase was the second best performer of the sale. Selling as lot #932, it realized a stunning final price of $100,000 — almost 20 times the low estimate, including buyer’s premium. What’s even more amazing is that the consignor, a dealer, bought the vase at a country auction two months ago for $75. Now there’s a story he’ll be able to tell his grandchildren!

Tiffany Favrile Milkweed pottery vase, Rago lot #538

The second-best Tiffany lot of the sale was a pottery vase with milkweed design, with a few minor flaws. Tiffany pottery vases are rarer than glass vases and those with organic designs tend to be the most desirable, so it shouldn’t have been a surprise when it more than tripled its low estimate, selling for $42,500, against a pre-sale estimate of $12,500 – $17,500. But as amazing as the Tiffany floriform vase, this vase was rescued from a New York State home about to be demolished. It was saved from the trash and free. Kudos to the consignor!

For the complete results of the sale, click on the following link. Rago 20th/21st Century Design results.

No more shows in 2012, so we’ll be spending the time buying treasures for the 2013 antiques season which begins with the Birchwood Manor Antiques Show in Whippany, New Jersey, January 5-6, 2013. (We might also find a little time for R&R.) After that we’ll be traveling south for the important Miami shows in late January and early February. In the meantime, we’re still in business, so keep the inquiries coming. Let me know what you’d like to buy, sell or trade. If you need a Christmas present, NOW is the time. I’ll be adding many new items to my website this week.

Just purchased this unbelievable Gallé seagull vase — one of the best Gallé vases I’ve ever owned

Click this link to view some of the new objects I recently purchased and listed. French glass for sale. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show.

Wonderful Schneider controlled bubble vase with wheel-carved Art Deco handles, recently acquired

Look around my website. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. I regularly add Tiffany vases, lamps and desk accessories, as well as French cameo glass by Galle and Daum Nancy and etchings by Louis Icart. Here’s the link. Philip Chasen Antiques.

4 thoughts on “Some incredible prices at Rago’s 20th/21st Century Design Auction, October 26-27, 2012

  1. Can you give some insight as to why the tiles would sell for such a price. Did Rago miss something in their estimate? Thanks

  2. Anything can happen on a particular day at an auction. All you need are two determined bidders and the rest of the crowd can go home. The tiles were very rare and beautiful and on this day two wealthy buyers HAD to have it. Love to see it!

  3. Thank you for the reply. How would you have priced them? Or are they so rare that pricing is difficult.

  4. David Rago is very knowledgeable and knows how to price ceramics. Unique items are very difficult to price because there are no comparable items that have sold before. Additionally, it’s very smart auctioneering to price an item low. Everyone thinks they’re in the game, so participation increases and so does the price.

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