Loetz vase quintuples its estimate at Quinn’s Auction Galleries, May 17, 2014

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

Beautiful Loetz decorated vase, Quinn lot #156

Beautiful Loetz decorated vase, Quinn lot #156

Quinn’s Auction Galleries held a Fine & Decorative Arts auction on May 17, 2014. Included in the sale was a lovely unsigned, decorated, Loetz vase with silver overlay decoration. It was sold as lot #156 of 575. Interest was high, allowing it to fly past its estimate of $800 – $1,200 to sell for $10,030, including buyer’s premium. The pretty, Art Nouveau, silver overlay only added to its appeal.

A closeup of the initials EHW

A closeup of the initials EHW

Loetz was one of the companies that wasn’t careful about signing its pieces. Tiffany Studios signed most everything (but not all), while I approximate that Loetz signed about 50% of its wares. There’s no mistaking a high quality unsigned Loetz vase, so lack of a signature usually has little effect on its value. This was evident with the sale of this vase.

For the complete catalog, click here. As of the writing of this blog, the results haven’t yet been uploaded.

This wonderful Zsolnay centerpiece is just in

This wonderful Zsolnay centerpiece is just in


It’s spring, so there are no shows, but we’re still very much in business.  Click here to view my new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

4 thoughts on “Loetz vase quintuples its estimate at Quinn’s Auction Galleries, May 17, 2014

  1. Bonnie, I don’t have an email list. If you like my blog, I post a new one every Monday and many Thursdays. Best. Philip

  2. I really enjoy your blog Philip. In fact Loetz only signed from 1898 to 1903 and even at this time it is not clear yet which criteria had to be met for a vase to be signed. Most of the more precious objects were signed, for example the pieces from the Paris World Exhibition 1900. Best wishes from an Austrian colleague.

  3. Thanks for your kind comments, Nikolaus. It’s good information you’ve given me, and curious. Why did they stop signing in 1903?

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