Some superb items were sold at Rago Auctions The Jerome Shaw Collection, October 14, 2016

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Sorry for the delayed coverage of the Rago Auctions in October. I meant to write about them earlier, but life got in the way. I covered Rago’s October 15, 2016 Mid-Mod sale last week. Today I’m covering the high end, eclectic Jerome Shaw Collection, which Rago sold on October 14, 2016, with mixed results. I think the aggressive estimates on the best lots held back some of the interest.

Carabin sculpture, Rago lot #13

The top lot of the sale was a hand-sculpted wooden sculpture entitled Femme et Grenouille (Woman and Frog), exhibited in 1907 at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts. It sold below its low estimate of $150,000, realizing $150,000 with buyer’s premium. Carabin was a sculpting genius, whose work is on display in many museums, including the Musée D’Orsay. (See my post of 1/17/12)

Loetz black-bottom vase, Rago lot #49

Two important Loetz vases, lots #48 and #49, sold for prices near their low, but strong, estimates. Lot #49 was a monumental, 18″, Phänomen vase, model no. 387, usually referred to as a black-bottom vase. It sold just below its low estimate of $50,000, realizing $53,125, with buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Studios turtleback inkwell, Rago lot #143

I’ve been following the travels of lot #143 for a few years. Originally it sold to a dealer at Nadeau’s Auction in Windsor, Connecticut on October 30, 2010 for $37,500. That dealer sold it to a collector (who I now assume was Jerome Shaw) for $75,000. At this sale it sold within its pre-sale estimate of $40,000 – $60,000, realizing $53,125, including buyer’s premium, a loss for Shaw. I’ve always loved this item for both its beauty and rarity. If I were just a collector, I would have tried to buy it.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


I just bought this killer Martin Brother 11½-inch bird.

I just bought this killer Martin Brother 11½-inch bird.

I’ve been listing on my website many of the new items I’ve recently purchased and I’ll be listing more in the near future, including a couple of fabulous Martin Brothers birds and a great face jug. Please check my site as often as you can.

No more shows in 2016. Our next show will be the NYC Big Flea, the weekend of January 21, at the Lexington Avenue Armory. After that we’ll be in Miami for the Miami Antiques + Art + Design Show, February 3 – 5, 2017. This is the airport show, which will be new and improved, with many additional exhibitors. The changes are happening because the Original Miami Beach Antiques Show will no longer be in Miami Beach, instead changing its name to The Original Miami Antique Show and moving to a new location in southwest Miami. It will all make for an interesting winter season.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Exceptional results for two Emile Gallé lamps at Rago’s Mid-Mod sale, October 15, 2016

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


I meant to write about this sale earlier, but life got in the way. So here goes. Rago Auctions held their Mid-Mod sale on October 15, 2016. Included in the sale was a small collection of Gallé lamps and vases. The two lamps sold very well, while the rest of the Gallé basically flopped.

Gallé floor lamp, Rago lot #532

Gallé floor lamp, Rago lot #532

Lot #532 was a Gallé floor lamp with allium floral decoration. Other than the rarity, I thought the glass was unexceptional, with only one technique (acid-etching) and uninspiring brown and green colors. On the other hand, the metalwork was fine and floor lamps are really rare. The bidders did not consult me and pushed the final price to $310,000, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $150,000 – $200,000. The air gets kinda thin at that altitude.

Gallé Allium table lamp, Rago lot #533

Gallé Allium table lamp, Rago lot #533

The next lot, #533, appeared to be a companion table lamp, which in my opinion was finer and more graceful than the floor lamp. It didn’t do as well, realizing $43,750, including buyer’s premium, against an estimate of $40,000 – $60,000.

Most of the other Gallé offered for sale did not sell, with a few exceptions. It was a mixed day for French glass at Rago’s.


I just bought this killer Martin Brother 11½-inch bird.

I just bought this killer Martin Brother 11½-inch bird.

I’ve been listing on my website many of the new items I’ve recently purchased and I’ll be listing more in the near future, including a couple of fabulous Martin Brothers birds and a great face jug. Please check my site as often as you can.

No more shows in 2016. Our next show will be the NYC Big Flea, the weekend of January 21, at the Lexington Avenue Armory. After that we’ll be in Miami for the Miami Antiques + Art + Design Show, February 3 – 5, 2017. This is the airport show, which will be new and improved, with many additional exhibitors. The changes are happening because the Original Miami Beach Antiques Show will no longer be in Miami Beach, instead changing its name to The Original Miami Antique Show and moving to a new location in southwest Miami. It will all make for an interesting winter season.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Rago Auctions Early 20th C. Design|Mid-Mod sale included French glass, June 4, 2016

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Rago Auctions held an Early 20th C. Design|Mid-Mod sale on June 4, 2016. The sale included ceramics, furniture and glass, but I will focus only on the French glass.

Daum Winter lamp, Rago lot #328

Daum Winter lamp, Rago lot #328

Top lot of the group was #328, a Daum Winter lamp. It sold for $13,750, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $7,000 – $10,000 — surprising to me because the lamp was a marriage. You can see the different color schemes in the shade and base, with bright yellow in the shade and much darker colors in the base. An original lamp would have a matching shade and base.

Gallé banjo vase with cicada, Rago lot #338

Gallé banjo vase with cicada, Rago lot #338

Lot #338 was a rare Gallé banjo vase with a cicada. It sold reasonably for $2,125, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $1,000 – $1,500. I was the underbidder and should have bid higher, but everything is 20/20 in hindsight.

R. Lalique perfume bottle Ambre de Siam, Rago lot #321

R. Lalique perfume bottle Ambre de Siam, Rago lot #321

A rare R. Lalique perfume bottle Ambre de Siam, Rago lot #321, sold for $10,000, including buyer’s premium, — below its pre-sale estimate of $10,000 – $15,000.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


Denver, July 15-17, 2016

Denver, July 15-17, 2016

No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, July 15-17, 2016. In the meantime, we’re very much in business, so call or email me with your wants or items for sale. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Some good results at Rago Auctions, February 26-27, 2016

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


David Rago Auctions held several sales this past weekend, including some that were single-owner. Some interesting results for glass and lamps were achieved (the only areas that I cover).

Tiffany Dragonfly chandelier, Rago lot #1

Tiffany Dragonfly chandelier, Rago lot #1

One single-owner sale from New Jersey was entitled Una Buona Vita. It began with Tiffany lamps, including the cover lot, a 28″ diameter Dragonfly chandelier. It sold within its pre-sale estimated range of $75,000 – $100,000, realizing $100,000, including buyer’s premium.

Argy-Rousseau pâte-de-verre Papyrus vase, Rago lot #48

Argy-Rousseau pâte-de-verre Papyrus vase, Rago lot #48

In the same sale, an Argy-Rousseau pâte-de-verre Papyrus vase sold well beyond its pre-sale estimate of $2,000 – $3,000, realizing $15,000, including buyer’s premium. The estimate was intentionally low because the vase had a restored drill hole in the base. There’s going to be one unhappy buyer if they didn’t know.

Jacquemard vase, Rago lot #468

Jacquemard vase, Rago lot #468

The most interesting result of the Saturday Early 20th Century Design sale was lot #468, a beautifully wheel-carved vase with a grasshopper and fancy engraving underneath, including “Emile Gallé fct 1895”. I haven’t been able to figure out exactly who made this vase, nor if it was actually made at the Gallé factory. Rago attributed the vase to J. Jacquemard, who possibly did it while working at Gallé. Regardless of my lack of knowledge, the bidding was very active, allowing this grasshopper to jump to a final price of $37,500, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $9,000 – $12,000.

For the results of the various sales, click here.


Click on this image to buy tickets

Click on this image to buy tickets

Our next show is not until April 15th, when we’ll be at the Chicago Botanic Garden, in Glencoe, IL, for the Garden, Antique & Design Show. It’s a beautiful show with both antiques and gardening, that you’ll absolutely enjoy. We only have two remaining shows in the greater Chicago area, so come and say hi!

If you’re selling, please let me know. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

I’m happy because I didn’t buy much at auction this past weekend

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


I bid at five auctions this past weekend hoping to buy a few items at reasonable prices. I’m happy to report that prices were strong, so I bought almost nothing. Happy, because if prices are strong, the market is good, and I love a good market.

Martin Brothers musicians, Leland Little lot #373

Martin Brothers musicians, Leland Little lot #373

One lot was #373 at Leland Little’s Fall Catalogue Auction in Hillsborough, NC, on Saturday, September 12, 2015. Three Martin Brothers stoneware musicians (two in perfect condition, one restored) were estimated to sell for $2,000 – $4,000, but sold well beyond my budget, for $8,850, including buyer’s premium. For the complete results of the sale, click here.

Joseph Frances Kernan, Rago lot #2715

Joseph Frances Kernan, Rago lot #2715

The day before, I got a bigger surprise at Rago’s Great Estates auction, Friday, September 11, 2015. I noticed a couple of interesting American Illustration paintings in the manner of Norman Rockwell. Both were by Joseph Francis Kernan, an artist I didn’t know very well, but whose work I admired. Lot #2714 carried a pre-sale estimate of $1,500 – $2,000 and sold for $11,875 after serious competitive bidding from two phone bidders. The same two bid the next lot, #2715, to $17,500, against a pre-sale estimate of $3,000 – $5,000. I was hoping to buy them at or below the low estimates. Goes to show you what I know.

Newcomb College scenic vase, Brunk lot #313

Newcomb College scenic vase, Brunk lot #313

Brunk Auctions may or may not have sold a lovely, large (10¾”) Newcomb College vase for $9,600, including buyer’s premium. I say may or may not because I really don’t know. The pre-sale estimate was $4,000 – $8,000. Auction houses never permit reserves higher than the low estimates, so once the bidding reaches the low estimate, an item is supposed to be sold. The hammer price reached $8,000, so it certainly appeared to have sold, but it’s listed on liveauctioneers as “Lot passed. No bid history.” I assume there’s a good explanation, but as of the publication of this blog post, I don’t know it. I wrote directly to Andrew Brunk, the owner of Brunk Auctions, and he responded that he didn’t know of the problem. It was his understanding that the vase sold at auction for $9,600.

In the meantime, I’ll keep plugging away and get my fair share. Luckily I also have private sources for my goodies, so I hope to be outbid at every auction.


nyc-big-flea-9-2015Our next show will be The Big Flea Market at Pier 94 in New York City, September 26-27. Last year was the first time for this show and it was good. The attendees were completely different than the established Pier Antique Show that takes place in November and March each year, making it a totally different experience.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Good results at Rago Auction’s Early 20th Century Decorative Arts Auction, October 18, 2014

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Rago Auctions held their Early 20th Century Decorative Arts Auction on October 18, 2014, with some good results, led by items from Newcomb College and Emile Gallé.

Newcomb College five-tile frieze, Rago lot #99

Newcomb College five-tile frieze, Rago lot #99

Top lot of the sale was a tie between lot 99, a five-tile Newcomb College frieze and lot 286, a Gallé lamp. Each went out the door at $81,250. That price was below the low estimate of $75,000 for the Newcomb tiles, but above the high estimate of $60,000 for the Gallé lamp.
Rare Gallé lamp, Rago lot #286

Rare Gallé lamp, Rago lot #286

Tiffany Studios  22" Drop-Head Dragonfly floor lamp, Rago lot #312

Tiffany Studios 22″ Drop-Head Dragonfly floor lamp, Rago lot #312

Several Tiffany Studios lamps were sold, mostly low-end. The exception was a Tiffany Studios 22″ Drop-Head Dragonfly floor lamp, consigned by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The color was only fair and there were a few minor condition issues, but the lamp still sold near the low estimate of $60,000, realizing $68,750, including buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


Morristown-10-2014
Our first show of four in a row will be held next weekend in New Jersey at the Morristown Armory, November 1-2. Then we travel to Chicago for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show, followed by the Kansas City Antiques Expo, ending up back at the Pier in NYC for the usual November show. Remember to check my website for the latest items and keep reading my blog. We’ll spend a lot of time finding some great new items for our November circuit.

Click here to view our new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

Why Do Vases Sell for More Than Bowls?

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

Today’s guest post is by David Rago, republished with permission from Bidsquare. David Rago is Partner and Co-Director of the 20th/21st C. Design Department of the Rago Arts & Auction Center in Lambertville, New Jersey.


Unless you’re selling gold ingots or diamonds, most fine objects don’t have intrinsic monetary value. So why would anyone pay tens of thousands of dollars for a Tiffany vase? To truly understand value, you have to understand the mindset of a collector.

Tiffany Studios, Fine Favrile pottery bowl with tomatoes, green and ivory glaze, New York, ca. 1900. Sale Price: $13,750, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Tiffany Studios, Fine Favrile pottery bowl with tomatoes, green and ivory glaze, New York, ca. 1900. Sale Price: $13,750, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Tiffany Studios, Rare glazed earthenware milkweed vase, New York, 1900s. Sale Price: $42,500, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Tiffany Studios, Rare glazed earthenware milkweed vase, New York, 1900s. Sale Price: $42,500, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Let’s start by comparing vases and bowls. To simplify this exercise, assume you have a bowl and a vase made of the same material (pottery or glass, for example) by the same company, the same year, decorated by the same artist or one of similar value, in the same condition, and even the same size, though one is measured in height and the other in width. We’re pretty much talking about the same piece with that one notable exception. Would the value really be different?

Grueby, Large low bowl carved with leaves, Boston, MA, ca. 1905. Sale Price: $1,625, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Grueby, Large low bowl carved with leaves, Boston, MA, ca. 1905. Sale Price: $1,625, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Grueby, Vase with buds and leaves, Boston, MA, ca. 1905. Sale Price: $2,125, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Grueby, Vase with buds and leaves, Boston, MA, ca. 1905. Sale Price: $2,125, Rago Arts & Auction Center

For starters, a bowl takes up nearly twice as much space on a collector’s shelf than a vase. Few people have unlimited yardage in their china cabinets or fireplace mantels, and many collectors eventually trade bowls for thinner works.

Second, and this is no small factor, a bowl doesn’t show off an artist’s work as well as a vase. If you don’t have a vase and a bowl sitting in front of you, envision how the vertical flow of the artistry is easier to read on a vase. Even if an artist “works with the form” when decorating a bowl, choosing a trailing vine or a lyrical floral design, the decoration has to wind around the bottom of the piece, at best rising just a few inches above the shelf.

Additionally, because most bowls flare as they rise, and since most light sources shine from above, the decoration on a bowl is usually not lit nearly as well as it would be on a vase form. A collector has to be very sensitive to lighting and placement to show off a bowl properly if for no other reason than this.

Unusual Rookwood Wax Matte bowl painted by Louise Abel with red blossoms on a mustard ground, the interior covered in a mottled burnt sienna glaze, 1924. Sale Price: $764, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Unusual Rookwood Wax Matte bowl painted by Louise Abel with red blossoms on a mustard ground, the interior covered in a mottled burnt sienna glaze, 1924. Sale Price: $764, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Rookwood Wax Matte vase painted by Mary Helen McDonald and/or Louise Abel with purple nicotina plants on a raspberry ground, 1922. Sale Price: $1,920, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Rookwood Wax Matte vase painted by Mary Helen McDonald and/or Louise Abel with purple nicotina plants on a raspberry ground, 1922. Sale Price: $1,920, Rago Arts & Auction Center

Finally, bowls are more easily damaged than vases. A blow from above will often glance off of a straight sided vase. But the shape of a bowl, broad and flat, will often absorb the same level of impact, resulting in a chip or a crack. And bowls are more often employed in a way that can increase the likelihood of benign neglect. How many people have you seen force narcissus bulbs in a vase? Bowls are often available with flower frogs for this express purpose. The safest place for a valuable pot is in a cabinet or a high shelf, not the dining room table.


No shows until November, when we have four in a row. We’ll start in New Jersey at the Morristown Armory, then travel to Chicago for the Antiques + Modernism Winnetka show, followed by the Kansas City Antiques Expo, ending up back at the Pier in NYC for the usual November show. Remember to check my website for the latest items and keep reading my blog. We’ll spend a lot of time finding some great new items for our November circuit.

Click here to view our new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

Martin Brothers leads the way at Rago’s 20th Century Decorative Arts Auction, March 1, 2014

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

David Rago held two early 20th Century sales yesterday, March 1, 2014, The Lillian C. Hoffman Collection of American and European Ceramics and 20th Century Decorative Arts Auction. The Martin Brothers were well represented in both sales and did not disappoint. Many of the offerings exceeded their high estimates.

A rare Martin Brothers triple bird, Rago lot #18

A rare Martin Brothers triple bird, Rago lot #18

As expected, lot #18, a rare Martin Brothers triple bird, led the way. It easily trounced its estimate of $30,000 – $40,000, to sell for $112,500, including buyer’s premium. Another triple bird, lot #199, smaller, with no wooden stand, and probably an early re-glaze, sold within its pre-sale estimate, realizing $46,875.

Martin Brother frog tobacco jar, Rago lot #17

Martin Brother frog tobacco jar, Rago lot #17

A wonderful Martin Brothers frog jar, lot #17, also did very well. It nearly quadrupled its pre-sale estimate of $15,000 – $20,000, to sell for $87,500.

A rare Tiffany Favrile blue Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase, Rago lot #435

A rare Tiffany Favrile blue Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase, Rago lot #435

The cover lot of the 20th Century sale, a very rare blue Tiffany Favrile Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase, was the best Tiffany Studios item in the sale. To my surprise, it sold for the low estimate of $50,000 + buyer’s premium, for a total of $62,500. I thought it had a good chance of exceeding its high estimate, but some minor factory flaws may have hurt its result.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.

This internally decorated Burgun & Schverer mini vase is a recent purchase

This internally decorated Burgun & Schverer mini vase is a recent purchase

We have about three weeks until our next show, the NYC Pier Antique Show, March 29-30, 2014. That’s always fun and exciting, so make your plans to come to the Big Apple. In the meantime, we’ll be on a European buying trip looking for more treasures to offer for sale. You know we’ll come back with some exciting items, which we’ll exhibit at the show.

We'll have this wonderful Amphora portrait vase at the show

We’ll have this wonderful Amphora portrait vase at the show

Click here to view my new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps

Some strong results at Rago’s Early 20th auction, October 26, 2013

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

SEG fireplace surround, Rago lot #10

SEG fireplace surround, Rago lot #10

Rago Arts held an Early 20th auction on October 26, 2013, with some strong results. Leading the pack was a fireplace surround by the Saturday Evening Girls, for the private residence of Edith Guerrier, located near the Paul Revere Pottery works in Boston. It easily surpassed its high estimate of $150,000, realizing $219,750, including buyer’s premium.

Martin Bros. bird, Rago lot #125

Martin Bros. bird, Rago lot #125

Martin Bros. birds are hot and have been for years, making it difficult for auction galleries to attract good consignments. Rago has been able to buck the trend with several sales of fresh-to-the-market Martinware. Lot #125 was an 11″ bird, with a pre-sale estimate of $40,000 – $50,000. It sold for $59,375, near the high estimate.

Rare Tiffany scarab inkwell, Rago lot #383

Rare Tiffany scarab inkwell, Rago lot #383

Of particular interest to me was lot #383, a rare Tiffany Studios scarab inkwell. It was a beauty, with curved blue iridescent inserts and a beautiful patina. It carried a very fair pre-sale estimate of $5,000 – $7,000. I bid strongly, but had to drop out when the price moved into retail territory, with a final sale price of $25,000. Oh well, can’t win ’em all.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.

Pier-10-2013

We’ll exhibit next at the NYC Pier Show, November 23-24, 2013. The show is under new management, U.S. Antique Shows, which usually portends improvements. It will be our last show of the year, followed by the important Florida shows in January and February.

Fantastic Tiffany Favrile blue decorated vase, just in

Fantastic Tiffany Favrile blue decorated vase, just in

Click here to view my new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

Solid results at Rago’s 20th Century Design Auction, June 8, 2013

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

June is 20th Century month, with every major and some minor auction houses holding a sale. David Rago was first with a 20th Century Design Auction on June 8, 2013.

Martin Bros. bird tobacco jar, Rago lot #156

Martin Bros. bird tobacco jar, Rago lot #156

Lot #156 was not one of the surprises. It was one of several lots of Martinware, that included two tobacco jars. It sold slightly below its pre-sale estimate of $40,000 – $50,000, realizing $43,750, including buyer’s premium. Personally I didn’t find the bird attractive, so the result didn’t surprise me. A rarer dog tobacco jar, lot #155, that was estimated to sell for $15,000 – $20,000, sold for $18,750, right at the low estimate.

Frederick Rhead decorated bowl, Rago lot #105

Frederick Rhead decorated bowl, Rago lot #105

Lot #105, a Frederick Rhead 7¾” diam. bowl, was a pleasant surprise, in keeping with the recent stellar prices for Rhead’s works. It was the top lot of the sale, selling for $55,000, approximately triple its low estimate of $15,000.

Handel 15" diam. Arts & Crafts table lamp, Rago lot #69

Handel 15″ diam. Arts & Crafts table lamp, Rago lot #69

One of the biggest surprises for me was lot #69, a 15″ diameter Handel lamp, with a very simple repeating geometric pattern. Earlier in my career, when I was selling many Handel lamps, I would not have even purchased this lamp, at any price, because it would have been impossible to sell. How things have changed! Now it’s a very desirable Arts & Crafts model that sold for $12,500, against a pre-sale estimate of $7,500 – $9,500. Go figure!

I asked David for some comments about his sale. Here is his reply.

The Saturday session was 89% sold through the day. the first part consisted of 300 lots with an aggregate low of $800,000 and the hammer was $900,000 (plus the bp). The second part had an aggregate low estimate of $150k and it hammered at $245k. total for the day was a hammer of $1,145,000, about $200k over the combined low estimates. The sale felt more than 89% sold because most of the buy ins were insignificant lots, many with reserves under $1k. there was considerable action across the board with 100 phone bidders, 200 internet bidders, a substantial amount of absentee bids, and a full room.

What I found interesting about the sale was that there were few things that really took off (more about that in a minute). Mostly, it was good to very good material performing at or above where we expected it to be, consistently across the board. Furniture, which was the soft spot in our last sale, saw competitive bidding and was almost all sold.

A few pottery lots did exceptionally well. a Redlands cabinet vase with frogs hammered at 12k. a Rhead bowl for University City with a landscape hammered at $44k against a low estimate of 15k. an Ohr vase from a southern estate with a $20 – $30k estimate hammered at $38,000. And the Tiffany lantern attracted wide interest before settling at $22,000.

But again, while the sale lacked some of the six-figure drama of sales past it was something of an auctioneer’s dream in how a great deal of competitive bidding created a fast pace and strong results. The sale sold at nearly 100 lots per hour, above the 80-85 lots we normally see. When this has happened in the past it was usually the result of numerous passed lots (which take very little time). this was the first auction in recent memory to move briskly AND have so much bidding.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.

No shows until July 19-21, when we’ll be in Denver. A fellow dealer convinced me to try the show again. She said the show has new promoters, who filled the hall with buyers the last time. So we’ll give it one more shot. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to call or write if you would like to buy, sell or trade.

Just got this incredible 8½

Just got this incredible 8½” Daum swan vase

Click here to view French cameo glass for sale. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show.

Wonderful A. Walter pate-de-verre vase with lizard, just in

Wonderful A. Walter pate-de-verre vase with lizard, just in

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