Making sense of Tiffany Studios’ desk set numbering

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Jamie S. Reynolds

Jamie S. Reynolds

The following is a guest post by Jamie S. Reynolds, daughter of Gwen Stebbins of lilabycreekantiques.com, a Michigan dealer with over thirty years’ experience. Please feel free to contact her with your questions about Tiffany desk sets. Jamie@lilabycreekantiques.com or Gwen@lilabycreekantiques.com

Having known Phil Chasen my entire life, I jumped at the chance to contribute when asked to be a guest on his blog. Hopefully you will check back in the future for additional Tiffany Studios articles. –Jamie

Tiffany Grapevine stamp box, marked

Tiffany Grapevine stamp box, marked “41”

stamp 10stamp 6Much is made of signatures (typically for good reason!) in the world of Tiffany Studios desk set pieces, but with light research and deduction, it can be fairly easy to make sense of what seems to be anomalous. Most Tiffany desk set pieces bear a three or four-digit registration number along with the “TIFFANY STUDIOS” or “TIFFANY STUDIOS NEW YORK” stamp, while others are simply marked with the studio name. Three and four-digit numbers correspond to individual items. For instance “801” refers to Etched Metal & Glass (Grapevine or Pine Needle) stamp boxes. What confuses some people are the pieces with two-digit numbers. Apparently the two-digit numbers were used for assembly, as many of Tiffany’s desk items were complicated and constructed of multiple pieces. The separate pieces typically bear an assembly number somewhere, usually hidden once constructed.

Tiffany Grapevine box marked "801"

Tiffany Grapevine box marked “801”

Above is a Tiffany Studios stamp box in the classic Grapevine pattern, with registration number 801. While signatures (or lack thereof) are not the sole defining characteristic of Tiffany desk set pieces, a basic understanding of them can easily help a collector choose pieces that are correct but seem anomalous or, on the other hand, avoid pieces that do not coincide with any published information.


Denver, July 15-17, 2016

Denver, July 15-17, 2016

No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, July 15-17, 2016. In the meantime, we’re very much in business, so call or email me with your wants or items for sale. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

St. Michael’s Church in NYC is the perfect venue for meetings of the Art Glass Forum

The main windows of St. Michael's are spectacular

The main windows of St. Michael’s are spectacular

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


One of the many original Tiffany Studios windows in St. Michael's, with fantastic drapery and mottled glass

One of the many original Tiffany Studios windows in St. Michael’s, with fantastic drapery and mottled glass

The Art Glass Forum holds their monthly meetings at St. Michael’s Church on W. 99th St. in New York City. It’s the perfect venue for a glass collector’s club, many of whose members collect or sell Tiffany Studios Favrile glass and lamps. Much of the interior of the chapel was designed and made by Tiffany Studios. It’s a gorgeous and fitting location.

The window above is signed and dated 1912

The window above is signed and dated 1912

Yesterday’s meeting included a lecture by Amy McHugh, the assistant archivist at Tiffany & Co., entitled Cabinet Curiosities: Silver-Mounted Favrile Glass by Louis Comfort Tiffany and Tiffany Studios. She researches their extensive archives, which include some collaborations with Tiffany Studios. (Charles Lewis Tiffany was one of the founders of Tiffany & Co. and the father of Louis Comfort Tiffany, founder of Tiffany Studios.) Amazing what you can learn at one of the lectures.

The entire wall is made of tiny iridescent mosaic tiles

The entire wall is made of tiny iridescent mosaic tiles

Membership in the Art Glass Forum is open to the public. Yearly dues are quite reasonable, $70 for individuals, $90 for households and $25 for students and young professionals. If American or European art glass interests you, why don’t you join and attend the lectures? Contact artglassforumny@gmail.com. They accept PayPal, checks, shekels, whatever you like.
The colorful iridescent Favrile glass tiles are spectacular

The colorful iridescent Favrile glass tiles are spectacular


Denver, July 15-17, 2016

Denver, July 15-17, 2016

No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, July 15-17, 2016. In the meantime, we’re very much in business, so call or email me with your wants or items for sale. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Identifying the newest Tiffany Favrile reproductions

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Several years ago I bought a Tiffany Favrile vase that bothered me somewhat. The vase looked contemporary, but the signature was perfect, so I thought my instincts were wrong. I showed it to another dealer who thought the vase was modern, but I still didn’t listen. After all, I’m an expert on Tiffany signatures and this was perfect.

Reproduction Tiffany Favrile vase

Reproduction Tiffany Favrile vase

Fast forward to today. I now know for a fact the vase was a reproduction. Apparently someone is signing new vases with picture-perfect signatures. It’s like looking at a forged copy of your own signature that’s so good, you’re not sure if you didn’t sign it yourself.

tiffany-reproduction-2Let’s take a good look at the example above. To those who are knowledgeable, the vase is an obvious reproduction. Everything about it is wrong, including the decoration and color, but especially the iridescence. Then look at the signature. It’s perfect, and includes the notation “A. Coll.”, meaning it was in the personal collection of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Poor Louis is so unhappy, he’s turning in his grave.

What’s the lesson here? You cannot tell an authentic vase, of any kind, from the signature alone. The shape, the decoration, the workmanship, the wear, the age AND the signature all have to say the same thing — I am authentic.


Denver, July 15-17, 2016

Denver, July 15-17, 2016

No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, July 15-17, 2016. In the meantime, we’re very much in business, so call or email me with your wants or items for sale. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Cottone Auctions offered Tiffany Studios lamps for sale on March 19, 2016

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

Cottone Auctions held a 30 Year Anniversary Fine Art & Antique Auction on Mar 19, 2016. Included in the sale were four Tiffany Studios leaded lamps.

Tiffany geometric and ball table lamp, Cottone lot #265

Tiffany geometric and ball table lamp, Cottone lot #265

Top lot of the group was #265, a rare 22″ diameter geometric and ball lamp. It sold within its estimated range of $50,000 – $75,000, realizing $72,450, including buyer’s premium.

Tiffany Studios 20" diameter Daffodil table lamp, Cottone lot #260

Tiffany Studios 20″ diameter Daffodil table lamp, Cottone lot #260

The second best result was a 20″ diameter Daffodil table lamp. It sold toward the lower end of its estimated range of $30,000 – $50,000, realizing $35,650, including buyer’s premium.

Lot #271 was a 16″ Acorn table lamp with a few condition problems, described as “Shade slightly out of round and several cracked panels. Base has original patina, some wear, small dent.” It also sold at the low end of its estimate of $7,000 – $10,000, realizing $8,625, including buyer’s premium. Lot #267 was a 24″ diameter Curtain Border floor lamp. It failed to sell with an estimate of $50,000 – $75,000.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


Click on this image to buy tickets

Click on this image to buy tickets

Our next show is only two weeks away. We’ll be in Glencoe, IL, for the Garden, Antique & Design Show, at the Chicago Botanic Garden, starting April 15th. It’s a beautiful show, with both antiques and gardening, that you’ll absolutely enjoy. We only have two remaining shows in the greater Chicago area, so come and say hi!

If you’re selling, please let me know. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Some good results at Bonham’s New York 20th Century Decorative Arts sale, December 17, 2015

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


It’s December 31, 2015. Wishing everyone a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year, filled with Peace!

Bonham’s New York held their 20th Century Decorative Arts sale on December 17, 2015, immediately following their The Artistry of Tiffany sale. I will only concern myself with the beginning of the sale, which included works by Tiffany Studios, the Martin Brothers and Daum Nancy.

Tiffany Studios Floral Bouquet chandelier, Bonham's lot #1008

Tiffany Studios Floral Bouquet chandelier, Bonham’s lot #1008

The first nine lots of the sale were offerings by Tiffany Studios. Of this group, the top lot was a 28¼” diameter Floral Bouquet chandelier. It doubled its high estimate of $120,000, realizing an impressive $293,000, including buyer’s premium. There are more buyers for table lamps than chandeliers, which made the result even more notable. It easily exceeded the high of $137,000 for all of the Tiffany Studios items in the previous The Artistry of Tiffany sale.

Martin Brothers aquatic vase, Bonham's lot #1010

Martin Brothers aquatic vase, Bonham’s lot #1010

Lot #1010 was a large, incredible Martin Brothers stoneware aquatic vase from 1892, with 3-dimensional carving and barnacles. I was drooling over this vase, especially with an unbelievably low estimate of $2,000 – $3,000. I knew I had a chance, but only if the major collectors weren’t interested. I was willing to pay way over the high estimate, but unfortunately I wasn’t the buyer. At $20,000, I was the underbidder. Oh well. At least I made the buyer pay, but I really wanted this lot. Martin Brothers collectors have deep pockets, so I think I would have been outbid no matter what.

Daum Nancy Impressionist vase, Bonham's lot #1011

Daum Nancy Impressionist vase, Bonham’s lot #1011

The three Daum Nancy lots did very well, with the best results for lot #1011, an Impressionist vase with yellow trees on a purple mottled background. It easily exceeded its high estimate of $15,000, realizing $27,500, including buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


I’ve been quite busy buying and selling recently, partly because I’ve listed many new items on my website. I really need to buy more, so if you have something great, please offer it to me for sale. I am paying the highest prices of any dealer. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email me a jpeg.

I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.

We’re still very much in business between shows, especially since there are fewer shows nowadays. Please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Fair results for Bonham’s New York The Artistry of Tiffany sale, December 17, 2015

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Bonham’s New York held their The Artistry of Tiffany sale on December 17, 2015, with total sales of $820,000 for the very small 25-lot auction. 8 lots did not sell, which worked out to an average of $48,235 for each of the 17 sold lots, well below the results of both Christie’s and Sotheby’s.

Tiffany Studios 16

Tiffany Studios 16″ diameter Snowball table lamp, Bonham’s lot #8

Tiffany Studios 18" diameter Peony table lamp, Bonham's lot #15

Tiffany Studios 18″ diameter Peony table lamp, Bonham’s lot #15

Two Tiffany Studios’ lamps tied for best results at $137,000 each, including buyer’s premium — lot 8, a 16″ diameter Snowball, and lot 15, an 18″ diameter Peony.

Tiffany Favrile Aquamarine vase, Bonham's lot #18

Tiffany Favrile Aquamarine vase, Bonham’s lot #18

The top glass lot was #18, a Tiffany Aquamarine vase, made to depict aquatic subject matter. Aquamarine vases are heavy, with thick glass containing embedded glass objects, like a glass paperweight. Lot #18 contained embedded water lilies and was a nice size at 10″ tall. It sold within its pre-sale estimate of $60,000 – $80,000, realizing $81,250, including buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


I’ve been quite busy buying and selling recently, partly because I’ve listed many new items on my website. I really need to buy more, so if you have something great, please offer it to me for sale. I am paying the highest prices of any dealer. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email me a jpeg.

I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.

We’re still very much in business between shows, especially since there are fewer shows nowadays. Please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s new at Philip Chasen Antiques?

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Business has been good, so I’ve been buying up a storm (and selling quite a bit too). Most of my energy has been in French glass, but I’ve bought some wonderful items in other categories, including Tiffany glass and lamps, Loetz glass, Amphora pottery and much more. This entire last last week has been an exercise in continuous cleaning, labeling, and packing for our show next week in Denver. If there’s any chance you can make it, please try. Our display will be second to none. Here are a few examples of this exciting new merchandise.

Tiffany Studios 22-inch diameter Nasturtium table lamp

Tiffany Studios 22-inch diameter Nasturtium table lamp

How about a superb and huge Tiffany Studios 22″ diameter Nasturtium table lamp on an adjustable Cat’s Paw base? I haven’t had a Tiffany lamp this large and this fine in quite a while. It’s priced right, so it’s not going to last long.

Daum 17¼-inch blownout scenic vase

Daum 17¼-inch blownout scenic vase

Daum produced only a few different models of blownout vases, with the 11″ forest scenic the most common (and the most beautiful). What they made very few of is the large, 17¼” tall version. (This is only the second time I’ve owned this vase.) Besides rarity, it’s more impressive, with extensive wheel-carving between the trees and to the foot. It’s a stunning vase.

Daum inkwell with 4 applied insects

Daum inkwell with 4 applied insects

I love this Daum Nancy inkwell from the 1920s, which includes techniques developed earlier in the century. The 1920s characteristics are the bright colors and the foil inclusions. The technique is called paperweight, where the outer layer is clear glass. The foil and the colored glass are internal. The earlier influences are the applied and wheel-carved insects, four in all, each a different color. When molten, clear glass was applied over colored foil, giving each insect a different color — blue, purple, red or yellow. When the glass was cold, a craftsman engraver carved all of the details for each insect, including the legs into the body of the inkwell, making them very realistic and very cool.

These are only a small sample of the new items. Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around.


Keep checking my site, as I will be updating it often. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s new at Philip Chasen Antiques?

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Important Daum Nancy Impressionist vase

Important Daum Nancy Impressionist vase

We haven’t exhibited at any shows since the Chicago Botanic Garden in mid-April, so I’ve directed a lot of my energy to buying for the summer shows, the Denver World Wide Antique Show, July 24-26, 2015, and the Baltimore Summer Antiques Fair, August 20-23, 2015. We were successful both in France and in the US, so here are a few of the newest and most interesting purchases. I’ll be spending time this week and next adding as many new items to my website as possible. Keep checking back.

Fine, rare Tiffany Favrile red vase

Fine, rare Tiffany Favrile red vase

I bought a pair of rare and very desirable 7″ Tiffany red vases. I’ve known where they were for the last couple of years, but the dealer who owned them couldn’t sell them, because he insisted on selling them as a pair. The Tiffany numbers are very close to each other, indicating they were probably made on the same day. I have no problem selling them individually or as a pair. It’s not like a pair of candlesticks that were meant to stay together. On any given day, Tiffany produced a run of consecutively numbered vases that were meant to be sold individually. These red vases are no different.

Fantastic Austrian bronze novelty lamp

Fantastic Austrian bronze novelty lamp

I just bought this incredible Austrian bronze novelty lamp, 11½” tall. It was probably designed by Bergman, because this is the quality he created. The condition is superb, with original colored glass windows. Haven’t had anything this wonderful in Austrian bronze in quite some time.

Fine Daum Nancy Peacock Feather vase

Fine Daum Nancy Peacock Feather vase

Daum Peacock Feather vases are deceptively sophisticated. Most of the work on the vase is standard acid-etching, but not the centers of the feathers. The light blue and dark blue glass was applied when the glass was molten, then pressed into the vase on the marver. The process is called padding, which makes for special vases. I get one or two Peacock Feather vases yearly and they sell very quickly. This example is almost 12″ tall. (The vase is not in yet, so please excuse the quality of the photo. I’ll post a better one after the vase has arrived).

There’s lots more coming in in the next couple of weeks, including two important Daum Nancy Blackbird vases, two large Tiffany Favrile Jack-in-the-Pulpit vases, two Gallé Magnolia vases and lots more. Keep checking my site, as I will be updating it daily.


Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Good results for Tiffany Studios lamps at Christie’s Design sale, June 10, 2015

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Christie’s New York held their Design sale yesterday, June 10, 2015, with total sales of $7,687,750 for the 213 lots offered. Included in the sale were several Tiffany Studios lamps that sold well as a group.

Tiffany Studios 22" diameter Peony floor lamp, Christie's lot #14

Tiffany Studios 22″ diameter Peony floor lamp, Christie’s lot #14

The top lot of the Tiffany lamps was #14, a 22″ diameter Peony floor lamp that sold for $161,000, against a pre-sale estimate of $80,000 – $120,000.

Tiffany Studios 20" diameter Dragonfly table lamp, Christie's lot #11

Tiffany Studios 20″ diameter Dragonfly table lamp, Christie’s lot #11

Flying well past its pre-sale estimate of $60,000 – $80,000 was an unusual 20″ Dragonfly table lamp, Christie’s lot #11. It had nicely colored dragonflies against a pastel sky-blue, mottled background, with non-jeweled eyes, two amber geometric bands near the rim and amber jewels in the background. The shade rested on a twisted vine base, all with an original gold doré finish. I couldn’t decide if I liked it or not, but I was going to buy it if the price were low. Alas, that wasn’t the case. It realized $125,000.

All prices include the buyer’s premium.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, at the Denver Mart, EXPO Building, 451 East 58th Avenue, July 24-26, 2015. We’re still in business, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. Keep checking my website for the latest offerings, which I’ll be posting in the next week.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Good results at Sotheby’s The Warshawsky Collection: Masterworks of Tiffany and Prewar Design sale, May 19, 2015

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


On May 19, 2015, Sotheby’s New York sold a one-owner collection, The Warshawsky Collection: Masterworks of Tiffany and Prewar Design, which included 90 lots of outstanding Tiffany Studios objects. Only 2 of the 90 lots failed to sell. Sales totaled $7,951,125 for the 138 lots offered.

Tiffany Studios Oriental Poppy floor lamp, Sotheby's lot #36

Tiffany Studios Oriental Poppy floor lamp, Sotheby’s lot #36

The top lot of the sale was #36, a beautiful Oriental Poppy floor lamp. It topped $1 million, with a final sale price of $1,066,000, including buyer’s premium, against a pre-sale estimate of $400,000 – $600,000.

This rare Tiffany Studios Peacock frame, Sotheby’s lot #2, sold for $40,000, against a pre-sale estimate of $5,000 - $7,000

This rare Tiffany Studios Peacock frame, Sotheby’s lot #2, sold for $40,000, against a pre-sale estimate of $5,000 – $7,000

The sale started strongly, with frames and lamp screens selling for ridiculously high prices. Then reality set in and the sale lost a little steam, with some lots selling at or below their low estimates.

Tiffany Studios Grapevine frame, Sotheby's lot #85

Tiffany Studios Grapevine frame, Sotheby’s lot #85

A bizarre result was the sale of a medium-sized Tiffany Grapevine frame, lot #85, a common frame that I ordinarily sell for $2,500 – $3,500. It sold for the extraordinary price of $22,500, against a pre-sale estimate of $1,200 – $1,800. Whaaattt??? Some people have more cents than sense. Where are those clients when I need them?

Tiffany Studios advertising sign, Sotheby's lot #87

Tiffany Studios advertising sign, Sotheby’s lot #87

One of the more amusing results came with the sale of an original Tiffany Studios bronze advertising plaque. It brought an incredible $20,000, against a pre-sale estimate of $800 – $1,200.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


We’re now in Lyon, seeking treasures, then back to Paris for a few days before returning home.

No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, at the Denver Mart, EXPO Building, 451 East 58th Avenue, July 24-26, 2015. I’ll always be in touch, even while we’re in Europe, so please don’t hesitate to email or call.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.