Some treasures I’ve owned, part VII, Daum Nancy glass

Lots of interesting things have been happening in the antiques world recently. Since I have a bit more time to write about them during the spring and summer, I will be posting new blog entries twice a week, instead of once — Mondays and Thursdays for the next few weeks. So make sure you come back often and tell your friends about my blog!

The Daum Brothers produced cameo glass in Nancy, France, starting in the 1880s. By the turn of the century, they were turning out masterpieces. Some of the most beautiful examples utilized the techniques of acid-etching, followed by hand-painted enameling and firing. Some of the vases, especially scenic examples, were wonderful.

A rare Daum Nancy farm scenic vase

One of my favorite vases had a farm scene painted with bright yellow. I’m not sure what crop was growing, but it must have been a beautiful sight to behold in person. I haven’t seen or owned another example of this scene since this one, about 15 years ago.

Gorgeous Daum Nancy fall scenic box

Daum produced vases with decorations of each of the seasons. Naturally, the fall scenes were the most colorful (and therefore the most desirable in today’s market). One distinctive box had particularly bright color (the colors vary from example to example) and beautiful detail.

A spectacular Daum Nancy summer scenic vase

The example pictured above is not your typical summer scenic vase. The birch trees were exquisitely painted with leaves in multiple shades of green. The artistry was so fine, the trees looked alive. The artist for this vase was especially talented. The unusual colors, the fabulous detail, the depth, all worked together to create a stunning vase.

Not all of my best vases were in the past. I’ve got some special ones for sale right now that will be included in a future blog. Please take a look by clicking on the following link. Daum Nancy glass for sale.

Rare Louis Icart etching Miss America

Check out my new acquisitions. I just listed a very rare Louis Icart etching, entitled “Miss America”, plus a gorgeous Daum Nancy pink floral vase; a rare Tiffany Studios desk lamp in the Spanish pattern; several fine Daum vases; a Daum lamp; several Galle vases; and several more Tiffany Favrile vases. Soon I’ll be listing a wonderful Tiffany Studios 7-light lily lamp with beautiful shades and a fine patina. Also coming soon will be several wonderful European ceramic items by Clement Massier, Zsolnay and Amphora. Here’s the link. chasenantiques.com

Some treasures I’ve owned, part VI, art glass shades

This is installment VI of my “Some treasures I’ve owned” series. The topic was suggested to me by several collectors, but first by Matt Long.

I have a long history dealing in art glass shades, which includes one interesting story. I was exhibiting at a show on Long Island about 25 years ago, when I met a lovely older lady who saw I was interested in art glass shades. She told me she had some for sale and invited me to her home. When I walked in, she had about 125 mostly Quezal and Steuben shades displayed on several tables. At the time, she wanted $50 each for the gold ones and $75 each for the decorated ones — good prices even then.

Quezal blue pulled feather shade

Quezal blue pulled feather shade

I bought them all and then she invited me back for more. By the time she was finished with the shades, I had purchased about 500. I asked her how she had accumulated so many. She told me that when she was much younger, she would go to wealthy neighborhoods on trash day and find them for the taking. That was the beginning of a wonderful relationship that lasted about 10 years. I probably bought 10,000 objects from her, from $1 up, at great prices that she set. She was very knowledgeable but always priced her items so I could make money. She’s gone now, but she left me and my wife with fond memories of her.

One great shade I owned was a blue decorated Quezal, an extreme rarity and a real beauty (pictured above). This may be my favorite shade of all time.

Quezal dark green wave decorated and floral decorated shades

Quezal dark green wave decorated and floral decorated shades

Dark green shades are also rare and floral shades even rarer. Pictured at right are examples of both of them.

The ones that got away are also interesting. About 20 years ago, a dealer told me about a set of Quezal red shades with zipper decoration that was in a house. This is one shade I have never owned and never seen. I tried hard to get them, but the dealer was so low key, he let them get away. I heard they had made their way into some great collections.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. In the last few days I’ve added to the Gallé glass and Icart etchings listings. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog.

Some treasures I’ve owned, part V, Gallé blownout vases

Gallé blownout elephant vase

Gallé blownout elephant vase

Emile Gallé died in 1904, but the company he founded continued in business until the Great Depression. Production stopped during WWI, but then continued after the war. It was during that time that blownout vases were created. Sometimes they are referred to as mold-blown or soufflé, in France. The technique is first to create a mold and blow the glass into the mold. That creates the identical shape for successive examples, but not identical colors. The artist is still free to change the colors for each example. The colored layers are applied to the vase and then etched with acid. There are roughly 30 different models, from simple models with berries to exotic ones with elephants. What makes one better than another is the design, the color and the size.

Elephants are amongst the best Gallé blownout vases. The usual coloration is brown elephants on an opalescent or yellow background. There is also a rarer example with white elephants. Gallé elephant vases are large and impressive. The example above was a beauty.

Gallé blownout calla lily vase

Gallé blownout calla lily vase

The largest Gallé blownout vase is the calla lily. It’s huge, heavy, and spectacular. This particular example had great color with red lilies on a yellow-amber background. This model also exists with blue calla lilies and is exceptionally beautiful.

Gallé blownout clematis vase

Gallé blownout clematis vase

Sometimes an additional layer of color (usually white) is added to give the flowers even more of a three-dimensional and realistic look. These examples are quite rare and usually gorgeous. The example below has a layer of white glass beneath the red and makes the clematis flowers appear dramatic.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass (including a blownout vase), Daum Nancy glass and Tiffany Studios glass. Soon I’ll be adding many Tiffany Studios desk pieces. Many are priced right for great holiday gift-giving. Who wouldn’t like to receive a genuine Tiffany desk set accessory as a Christmas or Chanukah gift? I’ll soon be starting a big sale on Icart etchings. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more.chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Call or write and let me know what you would like to buy, sell, or trade. philchasen@gmail.com or 516-922-2090. And please visit my website. chasenantiques.com

Some treasures I’ve owned, part IV, Tiffany Studios desk items

Tiffany Studios Pine Needle clock

Tiffany Studios Pine Needle clock

Tiffany Studios desk sets have become quite popular in the last few years. I think publication of the Kemeny book on Tiffany desk sets galvanized public interest. Since the publication of the book, prices have gone up 10-fold on many items. Some of the items show up repeatedly, so it’s a kick for me when I find a rarity. Even the rarities are still priced within many collector’s budgets, with a high of about $10,000 for most, except the nearly impossible-to-find Pond Lily pattern. Some of you may remember that a set of six Pond Lily desk items sold for over $200,000 at an auction in North Carolina about 2 years ago.

The Pine Needle pattern has become more popular in the last year or so. A clock is one of the items that’s quite rare in any Tiffany desk set. The pictured example had a beautiful patina.

Tiffany Studios Grapevine set

Tiffany Studios Grapevine set

I never knew a combination tray, inkwell, wax seal, matchbox holder, and pen existed, until I was offered this one.  This particular example was complete and had one of the best original patinas one could ask for.  I wish I had 10 more, but then it wouldn’t be quite as rare.

Tiffany Studios clock with signs of the Zodiac

Tiffany Studios clock with signs of the Zodiac

This clock is not part of the Zodiac pattern but it does have the signs of the Zodiac. It’s quite rare and in stupendous condition with colorful original enameling. Some Tiffany desk set items come with or without enameling. The rarer ones are enameled and those where the enameling is in great original condition are the rarest of all.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Call or write and let me know what you would like to buy, sell, or trade. philchasen@gmail or 516-922-2090. And please visit my website. chasenantiques.com

Some treasures I’ve owned, part III, Martin Brothers Stoneware

A rare and fantastic Martin Brothers stoneware creature

A rare and fantastic Martin Brothers stoneware creature

If you’re not familiar with the Martin Brothers of London & Southall, you should be. They produced the zaniest, most whimsical stoneware that one could imagine. What’s amazing is that they did it over 100 years ago. Many Martin Brothers objects look like they could have been made yesterday.

A Martin Brothers spoon warmer

A Martin Brothers spoon warmer

It’s hard to be neutral about Martin Bros. ceramics — either you love it or you hate it. In case you couldn’t figure it out (of course you could), I fall into the “I LOVE IT!” category. I look at a wonderful piece and smile. I love all the categories of items I sell, but Martin Brothers has to be my favorite. There are quite a few important collectors who agree and have put their money where their mouths are — I’m talking about very serious and valuable collections.

A rare and wonderful Martin Brothers double bird of two lovers.

A rare and wonderful Martin Brothers double bird of two lovers.

Early Martin Bros. ceramics from the 1870s and 1880s was for lack of a better word “ordinary”. They produced vases with simple and realistic flowers or geometric decorations. At some point in the 1890s, they started to produce “grotesque” objects with sea creatures or monsters, or wildly imaginative birds. The more grotesque, the better. Today, the most famous and highly sought after pieces are the bird tobacco jars, with removable heads. Each bird is an individual, with no two identical, as they were not made in molds. The more personality, the better the bird.

Save up your pennies, because Martin Bros. does not come cheap. A decent bird tobacco jar starts at $15,000 and goes up quickly from there, depending on the personality, glaze, size and condition.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Call or write and let me know what you would like to buy, sell, or trade. philchasen@gmail or 516-922-2090. And please visit my website. chasenantiques.com

Some treasures I’ve owned, part II, Tiffany Studios Favrile glass

Periodically I’ll write about treasures that I’ve owned and sold in my long antiques career. Today I’ve chosen a couple of wonderful Tiffany Studios Favrile vases.

Tiffany Favrile cameo vase, front and back views

Tiffany Favrile cameo vase, front and back views

Tiffany produced very few cameo vases, probably because of the difficulty in producing them and the high price they would have had to charge. The purple and green color glass is “padded” onto the vase when molten hot. The vase is then annealed and cooled. The rest of the work is done to the cold vase at a leisurely pace, unlike working with the glass when hot. All of the details of the leaves and the grapes is intaglio-carved by hand. Only the most skilled craftsmen had the ability to artistically carve the details and achieve such a special result. There were no shortcuts taken in making this wonderful vase.

Outstanding Tiffany Favrile flowerform vase

Outstanding Tiffany Favrile flowerform vase

Flowerform vases (also called floriform vases) were meant to look like growing flowers, so the classical Tiffany Favrile floriform vase has a skinny leg (the stem of the flower) and a beautiful cup (the flower itself). Some shapes are relatively common and some are special. They are as delicate and beautiful as the real flower. Not only is the shape outstanding on this particular vase, but it’s decorated in gorgeous, realistic colors. Many lesser Tiffany floriform vases are plain gold iridescent. This example is that one that I should have kept for myself, but unfortunately I can’t keep as many items as I would like or I wouldn’t have much of a business. This is probably my favorite of many Tiffany vases that I’ve sold.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Call or write and let me know what you would like to buy, sell, or trade. philchasen@gmail or 516-922-2090. And please visit my website. chasenantiques.com

Some treasures I’ve owned, part I, French Cameo Glass

I received two similar requests. Matt Long wrote. “Just a thought, what about writing about some of the most amazing pieces you have seen or dealt with over the years on your blog? The pieces that pop into your head. As much info about them as you have would be interesting to me and others I would think, as they would be great eye candy! And informative too.” And almost the same request from Joe Mollica. “Over the years I am sure you have seen some spectacular objects. Would you share some of the stories surrounding the objects and what made them significant?”

Thanks, Matt and Joe. Here are a couple of my favorite French cameo objects that I’ve handled over the years.

Burgun & Schverer vase

Burgun & Schverer vase

Burgun & Schverer is famous for their fantastic internally decorated vases. The work is technically complicated and the workmanship superb. This example has it all with extraordinary color that I haven’t seen in any other example. Every time I look at the photo, I go wow!

Rare and unusual Daum Nancy footed bowl

Rare and unusual Daum Nancy footed bowl

I’ve bought and sold countless numbers of Daum Nancy objects, but this is one of the most unusual and beautiful. The technique is acid-etching, followed by hand-painting with enamel and gilding, and finally firing. This technique is what most collectors are looking for. What makes this object so unusual is the great shape. Daum produced lots of bowls, but most of them were square with rounded corners and pinched sides. Until I bought this bowl, I’d never seen this shape before — a bowl raised on three curved legs that look like furniture. How cool is that? The decoration is the very desirable violets flower, with exceptional color and detail. The combination of the wonderful shape, subject matter, color and workmanship make this a superb Daum Nancy rarity.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Call or write and let me know what you would like to buy, sell, or trade. philchasen@gmail or 516-922-2090. And please visit my website. chasenantiques.com