Emile Gallé’s grave was spruced up after having been neglected

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


The family grave of Louis Majorelle

The family grave of Louis Majorelle

On my visit to Nancy, France in May of 2015, my colleague, Xavier Eury, took me to visit a cemetery filled with surprises. Inside were the graves of Emile Gallé and family, the Majorelle family, the Daum family and a whole host of very famous French designers and craftsmen of the late 19th century and early 20th century. Needless to say, I was shocked. I’ve been selling their works for decades and had no clue they were all buried in the same cemetery.

The grave of Emile Gallé, his wife, and his son in May, 2015

The grave of Emile Gallé, his wife, and his son in May, 2015

Emile Gallé’s grave was a big disappointment, as it was totally neglected. Disgraceful that the grave of the one of the most important glass makers of the Art Nouveau period was a mess! Everyone oohed and aahed over his glass but totally neglected his final resting place. How very sad.

I decided to take things into my own hands. After all, Gallé had taken care of me, so it was my turn to return the favor and show some respect. I emailed Xavier and suggested we split the cost of upgrading and maintaining the plantings at his grave. Xavier agreed and then took care of it himself.

Emile Gallé's grave todayThe result is lovely. Here’s the updated photo from August, 2016. I think you’ll agree it’s a very nice improvement.


winnetka-2016Our next show will be in Winnetka, Illinois, November 4-6, 2016. We always look forward to exhibiting in the greater Chicago area. We have lots of friends and clients. Put it in your calendar. It’s a lovely show!

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

A visit with John Atzbach at his museum of Shelby and Lamborghini automobiles

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


John's collection of Shelby Mustang automobiles

John’s collection of Shelby Mustang automobiles

John Atzbach is a friend of ours who my wife and I met through the antiques business. He is a specialist in Imperial Russian antiques, and an authority on Fabergé enamels.

That's John by his pride and joy -- the first Shelby Mustang competition car ever built

That’s John by his pride and joy — the first Shelby Mustang competition car ever built

So what does John do in his spare time? He collects, restores and displays important, vintage Shelby Mustang and Lamborghini automobiles. We visited him at his Issaquah, Washington, shop/museum.

John, 3rd from the right, with his team and his trophies

John, 3rd from the right, with his team and his trophies

In 2015 John exhibited his race-trimmed ’65 G.T. 350 at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, as it was the 50th anniversary of the birth of the Shelby G.T. 350. John won his category and Road & Track magazine’s “car they’d most like to take home from the event”.

The Lamborghini section of John's shop

The Lamborghini section of John’s shop

The Lamborghini on the wall is a Diablo VT factory prototype. It used to hang on the wall at the Lamborghini factory museum, so John decided to do the same. It has no engine or transmission, but still weighs 1750 lbs.

Our visit was great fun. Thanks for your hospitality, John.


baltimore-8-2016The Baltimore Summer Antiques Show is right around the corner, August 25-28, 2016. It’s the best show of the summer and maybe now the best of the year (with all the changes coming this winter in Miami). People fly in from all over the world to attend, including from as far away as Japan. If you haven’t yet visited, you should. It’s big, with some of the best national and international dealers. You’ll also enjoy Baltimore. Hope to see you there!

In the meantime, we’re very much in business. Call or email me with your wants or items for sale. If you have what I’m looking for, I’m paying the highest prices. My decisions are quick and my payments just as quick. Just snap a photo and email it to me.

I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. I will continue to list more as often as possible. Please click here to take a look.There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Shopping for antiques in Paris

The Louvre des Antiquaires

The Louvre des Antiquaires

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


A depressing look down one of the aisles of the Louvre des Antiquaires, with all the shops closed

A depressing look down one of the aisles of the Louvre des Antiquaires, with all the shops closed

Upon arriving back in Paris for the first time in a year, we visited some old stomping grounds. First up was the Louvre des Antiquaires, purportedly closed. Well not quite yet. Our visit showed it was open, but barely. Almost every shop was closed, except for a select few. In its heyday, the center was bustling with activity. Getting a shop there required buying out someone’s existing lease with key money, usually hundreds of thousands of dollars. What a depressing difference!

Rue des Rosiers, the main street of the flea markets

Rue des Rosiers, the main street of the flea markets

Next up were the flea markets near Porte de Clignancourt – disappointing, but not depressing like the Louvre des Antiquaires. In its heyday, much of the business was done in the middle of the night, with flashlights. The action started early, with fierce competition for the best merchandise. Nowadays, the pace is much slower. The flea markets have clients milling about, but there is no frenetic competition. Many of the dealers I knew have retired, leaving very few to do business with.

Wonderful Daum vase with two applied and wheel-carved dragonflies

Wonderful Daum vase with two applied and wheel-carved dragonflies

The trip wasn’t a waste. I was still able to buy some goodies from a few dealers, some of whom hid their best items. If they don’t know you, you’ll never see them. I’ll start to list some of them on my site as soon as I get a little time.

Now off to Barcelona for a few days – a city I’ve never visited, but have heard lots about. Of prime interest will be the Art Nouveau architectural masterpieces of Antoni Gaudi. We’ll also check to see if it’s possible to buy antiques there, but I don’t really see that happening.

No post this Thursday. The next new post will be on Monday. The topic will be Barcelona.


No shows until July, when we’ll be in Denver for the Denver World Wide Antique Show, at the Denver Mart, EXPO Building, 451 East 58th Avenue, July 24-26, 2015. I’ll always be in touch, even while we’re in Europe, so please don’t hesitate to email or call.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What is Photo Republic?

Billy Chasen

Billy Chasen

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.  Thursday’s post will cover the amazing story of the discovery of a lost $33 million Fabergé egg.

Take a photo of something unexpected

Take a photo of something unexpected

Many of you may know of my son, Billy Chasen, and his work on the Internet.  His last creation, turntable.fm, looked like it was going to be the next big thing, but unfortunately after the initial hubbub died down, the site ultimately was forced to shut down.  The initial publicity put him on the cover of Inc. magazine and had him written about in Forbes magazine, The New York Times, techcrunch.com and every business and tech publication that mattered.  Billy has also created other websites including chartbeat.com, and stickybits; was the co-founder of betaworks, and is the creator of another fun app called ketchup (also available as a free app).

Take a photo of what's in your pocket

Take a photo of what’s in your pocket

Billy’s fertile mind never stops working, so he’s ever creating.  One of his latest ideas is just great fun.  It’s an app called Photo Republic that’s available for download free for both iPhone and Android.  Once a day at a different time, you’ll receive a message to take a photo within the next 15 minutes.  Some past requests have been “Take a photo of your shoes” or “Take a photo of what’s in front of you”.  As the photos come in, they’re displayed in a grid, with the city and country of origin.  The message goes out to the entire world simultaneously, so you’ll see a montage of worldwide photos. It takes a few seconds and it’s really fun to see the results coming in from Valparaiso, Chile, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Vienna, Austria, Auckland, New Zealand and all over the US and Canada.

I suggest you download the app and tell your friends in close and distant locations to download it too.  You’ll enjoy it!

This wonderful Daum Nancy fall scenic vase is just in

This wonderful Daum Nancy fall scenic vase is just in

It’s spring, so there are no shows, but we’re still very much in business.  Click here to view my new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

A Swiss air show adventure at the top of a mountain

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

If you follow my blog, you know that we were in Parma, Italy to attend a huge antiques fair, at the invitation of the Italy-America Chamber of Commerce Southeast (IACC) and the Fiere di Parma. After the show, we decided to take a side trip to Switzerland — land of the Alps and infinite scenic beauty.

The peak is 30 minutes away.  Look for the white porta potties at the top, in the distance

The peak is 30 minutes away. Look for the white porta potties at the top, in the distance

Trying to figure out what to do on our trip, I searched the Internet and found out there would be a Swiss air show nearby on the dates we would be in Switzerland. Did you know Switzerland has an active military? I didn’t. Everyone’s heard of Swiss Army knives, but that was just a name. Why do they need a military? They never fight any wars. They guard the pope, but I didn’t think they do anything else. Seems like a good job to join the Swiss military, knowing you’re never going to fight in a war. However, domestic search and rescue, as well as peacekeeping missions around the world, are part of their job.

The show was scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, October 9th and 10th. The concierge at our hotel called to get information and found out we could go on Tuesday, October 8th. It was a practice day for the show, unadvertised, but still the same show. Great! We went.

The crowd at the peak is awaiting the start of the show

The crowd at the peak is awaiting the start of the show

All we would have to do is get to the top of the Axalp mountain. No problem! The road to Axalp was closed on Wednesday and Thursday, but not on Tuesday. So off we drove up a winding mountain road to the Axalp. Everyone was prepared for a crowd, even on Tuesday. We had to pay 12 Swiss francs (CHF) to park. (They don’t use the euro in Switzerland.) Then we stopped for some breakfast in a lovely local restaurant, and proceeded to the chair lift, also 12 CHF each. You see how easy it is to get to the top? They even gave us free Swiss Army caps for the cold at the top and ear plugs for the jet noise. The chair lift was a long ride, so how far could the top be?

The show in underway

The show in underway

We reached the end of the chair lift about 15 minutes later to find we still had a hike of 90 minutes to get to the top. Nobody bothered to give us any details. In the US, trails are usually marked easy, moderate, or difficult. In Switzerland, there are mountains everywhere, so they don’t bother much with trails or markings. You’re Swiss, mountains are a way of life, so get on with it. By the way, what is the next designation after difficult? There was no path, nothing flat, nothing smooth. We were in the clouds at that elevation and the grassy surface was getting muddy, making it even more difficult to climb. After 30 minutes or so, the terrain changed from moderate to steep. We had to stop every few steps to recover because of the altitude and because we weren’t in shape. It was exhausting, with no guarantee there would even be a show. If the fog didn’t clear, there would be no show. I had confidence the overhead sun would burn off the fog by the 2 PM start time. At around 7000 feet, some blue sky appeared and then the weather got better. By the time we reached the summit (which took us 3 hours!!), we had a spectacular view. We were above the clouds, sitting in a mountain meadow, looking at the Alps. There was a concession stand and portable toilets at the top — pretty classy.

Gorgeous!

Gorgeous!

The announcer (they were set up with loudspeakers) told us we could set our watches for 2 PM, for the first flyby. True to his word, the first jet streaked by at 2:00 PM. The show was underway and it was great fun. The announcer thoughtfully made some announcements in English. After 30 minutes, the fog rolled back in and then it seemed we switched from fog to clear every 10 minutes. The 90-minute show was cut short, but at least we got to see some of it.

Lia is having a tough time on the way down

Lia is having a tough time on the way down

Now for the good part — going down. If we thought going up was difficult, it was a piece of cake compared to going down. Now we were completely in the clouds. The condensation was dripping from my hair. The path down was even more slippery. Lia fell a few times and was so miserable, she almost cried. One Swiss gentleman saw Lia’s distress and insisted on helping her down the entire climb to the chair lift. I insisted on buying beers for everyone, including the gentleman and his two friends.

We were in the middle of the clouds on the way down

We were in the middle of the clouds on the way down

That was it for the mountain, the Swiss air show, and Switzerland. Lia had had enough. She wanted out, so we left a day early to return to Italy. Switzerland is a beautiful place, with great people, but it was time to leave. It’s also very expensive. A New York $20 Thai lunch was $60 in Switzerland.

Now we’re off to Chicago to exhibit at the Winnetka Community House, this Friday to Sunday, October 18-20. The show opens to the public at 11 AM on Friday and continues until 5 PM on Sunday. We recently bought some great items, all of which we’ll have at the show, so please come and visit!

Wonderful 12" Daum rain scenic vase, just in

Wonderful 12″ Daum rain scenic vase, just in

Click here to view my new website and look around. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

Chasen Antiques has a new website!

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

me-Capri-9-29-13

I’m writing this blog on the balcony of my lovely hotel on the island of Capri, Italy. My beautiful wife is with me, the waiter brought a tray with a bottle of local white wine, pistachio nuts, cashews, olives and crackers. The weather is perfect; the view is amazing; and the day is perfect. So what am I doing? I’m writing my blog. Is that dedication or am I nuts? You decide.

website-9-29-13

Back to business. As most of you know, I’ve been working on redesigning my entire website. I’ve asked you to check it out while it was in beta mode, but now it’s a done deal. Please take a look and let me know if you think it’s an improvement or if it needs some work. There also may still be some bugs, which I hope you’ll tell me about. http://chasenantiques.com I’ve added many new items for sale and will be adding many more. Just give me a little time until we get back from Italy. We’ll be attending the fair in a few days, so I’m hopeful we’ll be successful in buying a few nice items.

Plaster casts of some of the bodies recovered from the ruins of Pompeii

Plaster casts of some of the bodies recovered from the ruins of Pompeii

In the meantime, we have to investigate the Amalfi coast, which includes Sorrento, Positano, and Amalfi. The ruins of Pompeii were special.

Wonderful 12" Daum rain scenic vase, just in

Wonderful 12″ Daum rain scenic vase, just in

Click here to view French cameo glass for sale. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show. Look around my website. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps.

Surviving Hurricane Sandy om Long Island, part II

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

A downed tree and power line on the north shore of Long Island

It’s Sunday night as I write this blog. Tomorrow will be the seventh day without electricity for my neighborhood. My timing on installing a generator was impeccable, just before Hurricane Irene hit last year. I wish my timing on buying and selling stocks were as good. Last year we were without electricity for three days. Seems like a piece of cake now. There’s a possibility we won’t have electricity for another week. Then there’s no TV (did the NY Giants win or lose?) or Internet, as well as telephones because they’re connected to the Internet. We have been able to get Internet through a Verizon MiFi device and our cell phones are working now.

Another downed tree and power line

Progress seems to be slow, but there were so many trees and power lines down, that it doesn’t surprise me. I really can’t imagine what it’s like in those homes that still have no electricity or heat. It’s been getting colder, so it’s getting more difficult each day. People lost all of the food in their refrigerators and freezers. Barbecuing has been the source of hot food for most people with no power. Restaurants that are open are doing brisk business.

A grateful resident of Oyster Bay, Long Island trumpets her victory

Gas lines are getting longer each day. People are waiting 1-4 hours at stations that have 30-50 cars, or more, on line. There are also big lines of people at gas stations, all with one or more gas cans. I think most of those people are powering portable generators. The problem seems to be two-fold — stations with gas have no electricity so they can’t pump OR stations can’t get gasoline. It’s a big mess that shouldn’t last too much longer, but it’s quite the problem now.

I spoke to one man who just got his power back. He had an ear to ear grin — he was so grateful. Makes you appreciate things that are easy to take for granted, like power. May I suggest to you to go out and buy a generator? I installed mine before I had any idea that we would have consecutive year major hurricanes. For the previous 16 years, we haven’t been without power for over 24 hours, and that was only twice. It doesn’t matter where you live. The weather is getting worse each year as a result of global warming and other natural disasters seem to be coming stronger and more often. You could be next.

The NYC Pier Antiques Show will be held November 17 & 18, 2012

In the meantime, I’m getting ready for the big NYC Pier Antiques Show that’s coming up very soon the weekend of November 17th-18th. It’s unbelievable how much great new merchandise I’ve bought recently and I’m going on another buying trip this week. (So there won’t be a Thursday blog this week.) Make your travel plans now for the show. The power is almost 100% on in Manhattan. The city will be humming by showtime. Visit the city — see the show and have a grand old time in New York!!

Just purchased this incredible 12″ Schneider padded and wheel-carved Medallion vase

Click this link to view some of the new objects I recently purchased. I recently listed over 25 new items. French glass for sale. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show.

I just purchased this rare, special Tiffany Studios red decorated Favrile vase

Look around my website. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. I regularly add Tiffany vases, lamps and desk accessories, as well as French cameo glass by Galle and Daum Nancy and etchings by Louis Icart. Here’s the link. Philip Chasen Antiques.

Surviving Hurricane Sandy on Long Island, October 29, 2012

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.

One of the thousands of trees that fell onto power lines

I didn’t know what to expect when Hurricane Sandy hit. In my mind, there would be the usual wind and lots of rain. My main concern was water infiltration into my house, especially into the basement. I was especially concerned about my daughter and her family, who live one block away from Long Island Sound, where the storm surge was estimated to be up to 15 feet. My daughter’s house is 12 feet over sea level, so the danger was real. I had visions of Hurricane Katrina with people being rescued by helicopter from their rooftops.

A truck is partially submerged in Bayville, Long Island

My daughter didn’t think the danger was that serious, so at first she decided to stay in her own house. On Monday, just before the storm hit, occupants of her town were told to evacuate if they lived below 15 feet. So she packed up her family and came to stay with us. We’re more inland and have a backup generator. She also has a backup generator, but it’s brand new, in a crate, in her driveway. The electrician never got around to installing it on time.

At first the storm didn’t seem too bad. There was some rain, but not anywhere near the amounts predicted. However, the wind predictions turned out to be more than accurate. My whole family huddled together while we listened to the wind howling. Once, we heard a big crack as a tree snapped and fell. We were having a party and felt safe in the house. We also didn’t want to scare our 3-year old grandchild. So we went to sleep thinking everything was fine.

Hurricane Sandy felled a huge oak tree onto our front lawn

When we awoke, the storm had pretty much passed, so we were able to go outside and survey the damage. What a scene! Our very large front yard was completely covered by a huge oak tree that had snapped. It came right up to the house and the parked cars in the driveway without scratching a thing. Out back, another huge oak had snapped off into the forest. Next to it, another one was leaning at a dangerous angle as it had been uprooted. Also out back, still another large oak had snapped off. We really dodged a bullet on this storm. Several huge trees down and no damage whatsoever to family and home. Thank goodness!!!

The local strip mall sits empty because of no power

As we got to drive around, the devastation became apparent. A tremendous number of trees had fallen onto power lines and utility poles, snapping them like toothpicks. It’s Wednesday night as I write this blog, and it looks likely that power crews won’t be able to restore power to my neighborhood for another 3-5 days. We’re the only ones in our neighborhood with a generator. I thought more people would have purchased one since Hurricane Irene hit last year. Now I think there’s going to be a run on generators on the entire East Coast. Go out and buy some Generac stock. They’re going to be raking it in for some time.

The line to get gas was long, as many stations had no electricity

So as I write this blog, here’s the latest for our neighborhood — no electricity, no telephone, no Internet, no local restaurants, no banks, no gasoline (because the pumps can’t pump without electricity). The supermarkets are open because most of them have generators. We’ve got electricity because of our generator and Internet because we have a Verizon MiFi hotspot that started working today. As for my daughter, things are looking good too. It took some time to wend our way through the back roads to her house as most roads were partially blocked by downed trees and power lines. Thankfully her house and property were unscathed. Some of the homes and businesses closer to the water didn’t fare as well.

Traffic is diverted along Route 106 in Muttontown, Long Island, as multiple crews cut trees and repair broken utility lines

It really makes you appreciate what you’re missing. It’s easy to take services for granted, until they’re gone. Now it will be sweet just to get back to normal.

Just purchased this incredible 12″ Schneider padded and wheel-carved Medallion vase

Click this link to view some of the new objects I recently purchased. I recently listed over 25 new items. French glass for sale. We always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on our website and at every show.

I just purchased this rare, special Tiffany Studios red decorated Favrile vase

Look around my website. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. I regularly add Tiffany vases, lamps and desk accessories, as well as French cameo glass by Galle and Daum Nancy and etchings by Louis Icart. Here’s the link. Philip Chasen Antiques.

What is turntable.fm?

Today’s post is personal, not antiques, and is about my son, Billy Chasen, and his work. Billy is a software engineer and entrepreneur whose last creation was stickybits. It was a great idea, but didn’t gain traction, possibly because it was ahead of its time. So Billy directed his software team in a totally different direction, into the music world. He created turntable.fm, which was launched a couple of months ago. The proud papa wants to tell you a little about it.

Turntable.fm

Basically turntable.fm is a social way to listen to Internet music. You enter the site and choose between creating a music room or entering an existing one. Each room can have up to five different DJs, who each play a song of their own choosing, in order. The music can come from turntable’s library of over 11 million songs, powered by MediaNet, or you can upload music from your personal library. The DJs are represented by avatars sitting at a desk in the front of the room and the listeners by avatars standing in front of the desk. Listeners can vote on each song, lame or awesome. Too many votes for lame and the song stops. The DJ gets a point for each awesome vote. Listeners can also chat, which is frequently very lively. That’s the basic concept.

The site has caught on like wildfire, so for the moment, Billy has had to restrict the number of people who can use it. While the site is in beta, you must be in the USA and you can only enter if you have a Facebook friend who is already using turntable. Quick growth can cause software problems as a site scales up the number of users. These software fires have to be put out immediately, so the users have a good experience — all part of growing pains, a good problem to have.

In the meantime, here are some of the Internet headlines. PCMag.com – “Turntable.fm: The Fastest-Growing Music Service You’re Not Using”; CNN Tech – “Turntable.fm: The cool kids’ Pandora?”; BetaBeat -“What Is This Magical Turntable.fm Everyone’s Talking About?”; NPR.org – “Turntable.fm: A Roomful Of Fun”. Just type turntable.fm into the search bar of your browser and read all about it.

Turntable.fm is actively hiring software engineers. They need “rock star” python and scaling engineers. Let them know if you’ve got the skills and want to work at one of the Internet’s hottest startups.

In the meantime, join me in wishing Billy and his team success.

Impressive 11½ inch Daum Nancy floral vase

Check out my new acquisitions. This week I listed a gorgeous Daum Nancy pink floral vase; a very fine Tiffany Studios Favrile flowerform vase — better than the one that sold at Christie’s for $27,500; a rare Tiffany Studios desk lamp in the Spanish pattern; several fine Daum vases; a Daum lamp; several Galle vases; and several more Tiffany Favrile vases. Soon I’ll be listing a wonderful Tiffany Studios 7-light lily lamp with beautiful shades and a fine patina. Also coming soon will be several wonderful European ceramic items by Clement Massier, Zsolnay and Amphora. Here’s the link. chasenantiques.com

What is Stickybits?

Billy Chasen

Billy Chasen

Today’s post has nothing to do with antiques, but rather my son, Billy Chasen, and his latest creation, Stickybits, which was launched a few days ago. Billy is a software engineer with a very fertile imagination, who would rather be called an inventor. His latest idea is so clever, I predict it will be a major success. The proud father wants to tell you about it at this early stage.

Basically, Stickybits allows digital information to be attached to a bar code. First you download the free app on your smart phone, like the iPhone or Google Android phone. Then you scan a sticker with a bar code and attach any digital information you want to the sticker. The sticker can physically be attached to anything, like your computer or a greeting card or a bottle of prescription medication. If the concept is a little fuzzy, let me give you a specific example. Let’s say I buy a birthday card for Aunt Vicky with a Stickybits bar code inside. I line up the whole family and record a video singing happy birthday to Aunt Vicky. Then I attach the video to the Stickybits bar code and mail the card to Aunt Vicky. When Aunt Vicky receives the card, she uses her smart phone to scan the bar code and voila, she watches the video. The information is automatically encoded with GPS information and a trail is formed. Information is added every time the code is scanned.

Stickybits logo

Stickybits logo

How about this? I’m going to put a Stickybits bar code on my business card. I can attach and change the information as often as I like. One day if you scan the code, you might see a photo of my latest purchase, or a link to my blog. On another day, there might be a video of me and Lia wishing you a Merry Christmas.

How about tagging an object with Stickybits and sending it on a random trip around the world, a modern-day version of message in a bottle? Everyone who picks it up can add their information to the trail of its travels with automatic GPS locations. That would make a cool TV show.

The possibilities are limitless, which is what’s so nice about this technology. Billy and his group have come up with lots of suggestions about what can be done with Stickybits, but there are many more possibilities that haven’t even been dreamt up yet. Once the technology becomes ubiquitous, the true potential will start to be realized. More information is available at http://stickybits.com. The idea is getting a lot of publicity and buzz. Here are links to several of the articles that have been written. The LA Times at http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2010/03/stickybits-barcodes-social-network.html. CNET at http://news.cnet.com/8301-13577_3-10467485-36.html?tag=mncol;txt Ecoconsultancy.com at http://econsultancy.com/blog/5592-q-a-stickibits-founder-billy-chasen

What do you think? Email me at philchasen@aol.com.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.