Setting up at the Miami National Antique Show, January 22, 2015

Monday’s blog will be postponed until Tuesday so I can include the results of this show, which ends on Monday.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


We're just starting to set up our booth

We’re just starting to set up our booth

We started setting up the Miami National Antique Show yesterday, but a few of the dealers started on Wednesday. Even though the show is smaller, I was impressed by the quality of the remaining dealers, including top-notch dealers like Toulouse Antique Gallery and Valerio Antiques.

The free lunch was very good

The free lunch was very good

Kudos to the management for providing free lunch to the dealers. It’s nice to be appreciated. This was never done before at this show.

Toulouse Antique Gallery

Toulouse Antique Gallery

Dealers prowled the floor buying from each other. I was lucky to be able to find some very desirable items, which I’ll have for sale at the show.

Valerio Antiques

Valerio Antiques

The show opens to the public tomorrow, Saturday, at noon, and will stay open until Monday at 5 PM. If enough dealers do well, there will be another show next year. We’ve exhibited at this show for decades and would be sad if it were to fail. Do your part by visiting the show and consider making a purchase.

Tune in Tuesday for the results.


miami-beach-show-1-2015Next Friday, January 30th, the eagerly anticipated Original Miami Beach Antique Show will open to the public. After all these years, it’s still a big deal. Dealers and attendees from all over the world flock there to do business. I imagine the total value of the merchandise on display is at least $1 billion. At a 10% sell-through rate, that’s $100 million in sales — not a bad piece of change.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The Miami National Antique Show will open this Saturday, January 24, 2015

Thursday’s blog will be delayed until Friday because I will be writing from the floor of the Miami National Antique Show. Monday’s blog will be postponed until Tuesday so I can include the results of the show, which ends on Monday.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


miami-airport-show-1-2015I missed the last couple of Thursday posts because I was really busy getting ready for Florida. There’s a lot of work involved in cleaning, rewiring, inventorying, pricing and packing a large inventory for shipment by truck. We’re going to be doing five shows in a row, so we had to think of everything. In the meantime, business has been good, so we also had to spend a fair amount of time packing items for shipment. I assure you I am not complaining, only explaining the time pressure.

This lovely 18" Tiffany Belted Dogwood lamp is one of many Tiffany lamps we'll have on display

This lovely 18″ Tiffany Belted Dogwood lamp is one of many Tiffany lamps we’ll have on display

So the Florida shows are finally upon us. As I write this blog in cold New York, it seems surreal to me that we’ll be in sunny, warm Miami this Wednesday, and open to the public for business this Saturday at the Miami National Antique Show (The Airport show). The dates are all screwed up this year, with the show opening on Saturday. Of course, that angered observant Jewish dealers who won’t do business on Saturday and confused just about everybody else. I think the boat show at the Miami Beach Convention Center was the culprit. Its dates were considered more important by the city of Miami Beach, so it took precedence over the antique show, which was bumped to start on Friday, January 30, 2015, instead of the usual Thursday start. That in turn caused the Airport show to start a day later. Got it?

A previous year at the Miami National Antique Show

A previous year at the Miami National Antique Show

The Airport show will be a little smaller this year, but still full of very high-end dealers, most of whom will be exhibiting at the Original Miami Beach Antique Show the following week. If you take the time to come to Miami a few days early, you can get first crack at all of this merchandise. Seems like a no-brainer to me, yet many people haven’t taken advantage of the opportunity. You could visit the Airport show first and then have a few days to soak up the sun and enjoy the great restaurants. Seems like a “win-win” situation to me. So what are you waiting for? Make your arrangements now, if you haven’t done so already.


miami-beach-show-1-2015The following week the eagerly anticipated Original Miami Beach Antique Show will open to the public. After all these years, it’s still a big deal. Dealers and attendees from all over the world flock there to do business. I imagine the total value of the merchandise on display is at least $1 billion. At a 10% sell-through rate, that’s $100 million in sales — not a bad piece of change.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s new at Chasen Antiques? Part III

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


This outstanding 18" tall Gallé is fresh from a Florida collection

This outstanding 18″ tall Gallé is fresh from a Florida collection

I’ve always been an active buyer and seller of French cameo glass. Recently I bought a collection in Florida, as well as many items in various locations. I’ve now got four Gallé lamps for sale. Usually I don’t even have one.

Galle Fuchsia vase, just in

Galle Fuchsia vase, just in

Gallé blownout vases are highly collectible and desirable. The Fuchsia example above is one of four different, beautiful blownout models I have for sale.

Gorgeous Burgun & Schverer  Bleeding hearts vase

Gorgeous Burgun & Schverer Bleeding hearts vase

Do you have any idea how much work went into the making of a single Burgun & Schverer internally decorated vase? I’ll tell you. First the gaffer (glass blower) blew the undecorated vase. When cold (24-48 hours later), the vase went to a decorator who hand-painted the flowers, branches and leaves with glass enamel paint. Then into the kiln to melt and fuse the design to the vase. At that point, the decoration was on the outside of the vase. It then went back to the gaffer to be reheated and covered with a layer of clear glass. The technique is called paperweight (because the decoration becomes internal). It was difficult, as well as time and labor-intensive. Many of the vases cracked during cooling. If it survived, 24-48 hours later, the cold vase was sent to a decorator who covered the vase with a waxy resist, hand-carved the leaf, branch and top rim icicles and then sent it for a hydrofluoric acid bath to etch the design. After washing and drying, the vase was heated to melt off the remainder of the waxy resist. Then off to an engraver who hand-carved the details in the flowers and leaves and the martelé flourishes in the background. Not finished yet. Then back to another decorator who hand-painted the gilded details in the veins of the flowers and the top rim. At this point the gold was black, so off to the kiln for still another firing. After cooling, (24-48 hours), out came a piece of art, with internal flowers, incredible workmanship, and shiny gold details, ready for sale. How long would you guess that took, by how many artisans? My best guess is two weeks of work and up to ten very talented glass artisans. I hope next time you look at an internally decorated B&S vase, you’ll have a different appreciation. The example pictured above was recently purchased. It’s gorgeous, with outstanding work and a rare, beautiful rose-red background.

Striking Daum Nancy Marine pillow vase

Striking Daum Nancy Marine pillow vase

Lastly I’d like to mention that I’ve been able to acquire several outstanding Daum vases, including the marine scenic example pictured above. Please take the time to look over the various offerings I’ve listed on my website. I tried to picture most of the examples I have for sale, but they’re not all there. Time doesn’t permit me to picture everything. Either you can ask me for something specific or best of all, come to see me at one of my shows in Florida. You won’t be disappointed!


miami-national-show-1-2015I can’t believe it. By the middle of next week, we’ll be in Miami setting up the Miami National Antiques Show (the Airport show) and by Saturday we’ll be open to the public for business. If you plan on going to the big Miami Beach show the following week, you should consider coming a few days early to visit this one. You’ll get first crack at some of the following week’s merchandise (and out of the cold!).

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

The remains of Louis C. Tiffany’s home — Laurelton Hall

Monday’s post should be up by noon.

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


This mansion sits right on the site of Laurelton Hall

This mansion sits right on the site of Laurelton Hall

I feel lucky to live only a few miles from Laurelton Hall, the home of Louis C. Tiffany. I wonder how many of the residents of the many mansions that now cover the 600 acres of the former grounds of Laurelton Hall know about its history. My gut feeling is that most of them don’t have a clue. The mansion above is one of a couple that sits right on the location of Laurelton Hall. In the backyard, one original wall remains. I’m curious if the owner is permitted to knock it down, or does it have historical status? What a joy it must be to live right on the same ground that Tiffany lived and breathed. It’s my opinion that if Laurelton Hall had never burned down, and were preserved, it would be one of the most visited sites in the entire USA. I dream about it.

Sagamore Hill

Sagamore Hill

Did you know that Sagamore Hill, the summer residence of President Theodore Roosevelt, is just down the road? Tiffany and Roosevelt were neighbors. Sagamore Hill has been beautifully preserved and is a must-see if you come to Long Island. Here’s another hint. Teddy Roosevelt is buried just down the road and almost nobody goes. It’s right next to the Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary & Audubon Center, 134 Cove Road, Oyster Bay, NY. My guess is that most people who visit Sagamore Hill never visit his grave, simply because they don’t know it’s there.
Historical photo of the minaret at Laurelton Hall (courtesy of http://www.oldlongisland.com/)

Historical photo of the minaret at Laurelton Hall (courtesy of www.oldlongisland.com)

The snowy view today from the beach

The snowy view today from the beach

You can see the blue glass at the top of the minaret

You can see the blue glass at the top of the minaret

If you travel to the beach at Laurel Hollow, next to the parking lot of the Village Hall, you can see the Laurelton Hall minaret, originally the smokestack for the power house. At the top, you can see the original blue glass. It’s in the backyard of the mansion pictured above in the first photo. (BTW, thanks to Chris Delloiacono for showing it to me. I’ve lived in the area for 25 years and never knew it existed.)

The view of the Laurelton Hall caretaker's house from Tiffany Road

The view of the Laurelton Hall caretaker’s house from Tiffany Road

Driving down Tiffany Road, you can see the caretaker’s house, near the original entrance to the estate. I might be spreading rumors here, but to the best of my knowledge, the house was occupied for many years by Bruce Randall. He was Mr. Universe in 1959 (way before Arnold Schwarzenegger). He’s the same Bruce Randall who not only wrote the forward to the famous book on Tiffany lamps, The Lamps of Tiffany, by Egon Neustadt, but the entire book. Supposedly, Dr. Neustadt was just the collector who put together his famous collection, while Bruce did all the writing. In another aside, you can view the Neustadt collection of Tiffany lamps in two places, the New York Historical Society in NYC and the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadow Park (the site of the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs).

If you’re planning a trip to New York, consider adding a side trip to the Oyster Bay, Laurel Hollow, Cove Neck area of Long Island. You’ll be rewarded.


There won’t be a Thursday post this week, but tune in next Monday for What’s New at Chasen Antiques, part III, with an emphasis on French glass.

miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next couple of weeks looking for still more treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. Wish me luck!

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s new at Chasen Antiques? Part II

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Happy New Year! I wish everyone a happy, healthy, prosperous New Year, filled with stories of kindness and peace.

If you follow my blog, you know that the first of five shows in a row will start in Miami on January 24th. I’m bringing lots of fresh items, many from private estates, but I have no problem selling anything prior. I’m a mercenary, so if you see something you like, please let me know and it’s yours, for the right price! :-) Call 516-922-2090, or send an email by clicking here, if you’re looking for something specific. (Remember to answer the simple anti-spam question at the bottom of the form or your email will not be sent.)

Beautifully painted, signed, KPM plaque

Beautifully painted, signed, KPM plaque

I’ve been buying some lovely KPM plaques. The example above is of a Gypsy child, beautifully painted. It’s fairly large, 11″ x 8½”, unframed, and in excellent original condition. People I’ve spoken to are split 60 girl/40 boy. If you absolutely know, please contact me, because I don’t have the answer. Most KPM plaques are copies of famous paintings in museums, so the answer is surely out there.

Rare Dard Hunter-designed Roycroft vase

Rare Dard Hunter-designed Roycroft vase

How about a Roycroft rarity? Dard Hunter-designed, mixed metal, hand-chased, 8″ tall, signed Roycroft. Not what you’d expect to find at Chasen Antiques, except for the quality.

Superb Amphora Allegory Portrait vase

Superb Amphora Allegory Portrait vase

Amphora portrait vases is an area where I’ve gotten lucky. I have several fine examples including the beauty pictured above, fresh out of an important collection.

Monday’s post will be a fascinating look at what remains of Louis C. Tiffany’s home, Laurelton Hall. You won’t want to miss it. In the meantime, please check my website. I think you’ll like what you see.


miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next three weeks looking for still more treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. Wish me luck!

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

What’s new at Chasen Antiques?

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Our five-show-Southern-circuit is around the corner, with the first starting in Miami on January 24th. This is the time of year when I scour the earth to find treasures. I’ve been a busy boy. There’s always luck involved and this year it’s been good. A large proportion of my new items are from private estates. Following is a sampling. I suggest you check out my website where I’ve listed some of them, but there are many I haven’t yet listed. Call 516-922-2090, or send an email by clicking here, if you’re looking for something specific. (Remember to answer the simple anti-spam question at the bottom of the form or your email will not be sent.) Thursday’s post will be part II of What’s New at Chasen Antiques.

Rare Tiffany Favrile yellow vase

Rare Tiffany Favrile yellow vase

Tiffany Favrile glass is one area where I’ve purchased some very fine items, including a rare yellow vase, pictured above, a black millifiori vase, a turquoise decorated mini vase, a hearts & vines vase, a red-orange vase and several other outstanding examples.

Fine, rare Tiffany Favrile Artichoke pottery vase

Fine, rare Tiffany Favrile Artichoke pottery vase

I don’t get many Tiffany Favrile pottery vases because they’re even rarer than Tiffany Favrile glass. I just bought a wonderful, big (11″), artichoke example with a great glaze.

Natzler  Tiger Eye Reduction Glaze vase

Natzler Tiger Eye Reduction Glaze vase

Another item I rarely get is Natzler pottery. If you don’t know, it’s mid-century and the best quality. This example has a great Tiger Eye Reduction glaze, with the original stickers, including the original price. A very cool item!

I’ve only touched the tip of the iceberg. Look for more this Thursday. In the meantime, please check my website. I think you’ll like what you see.


miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next three weeks looking for still more treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. Wish me luck!

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Bonham’s New York had a good 20th Century Decorative Arts auction, Tuesday, December 16, 2014

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Bonham’s New York held its 20th Century Decorative Arts auction on Tuesday, December 16, 2014, a day ahead of Sotheby’s. The sale was fairly small, with total sales of $1,136,534, for the 95 of 166 lots that sold. Many of the unsold lots were radios, which skewed the results. Tiffany lamps were a large contributor to the total.

Tiffany Floral Bouquet chandelier, Bonham's lot #52

Tiffany Floral Bouquet chandelier, Bonham’s lot #52

Leading the sale was a beautiful Tiffany Floral Bouquet chandelier, which easily exceeded its high estimate of $120,000, realizing $197,000, including buyer’s premium.

Webb perfume bottles, Bonham's lot #7

Webb perfume bottles, Bonham’s lot #7

Lot #7, two Webb lay-down perfume bottles, was a nice surprise. It soared past the pre-sale estimate of $1,500 – $2,000, to realize $21,250, including buyer’s premium. To be fair, the pre-sale estimate was quite low, and the quality was high. Mice are rare subject matter, the detail was superb, and the lids were 14K gold, instead of the usual sterling silver.

It was nice to see two sales in a row where Tiffany Studios lamps and glass sold well. It appears that the poor results at Christie’s sale were just an anomaly.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.


miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next month looking for treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. So far the buying has been great, so look for lots of new goodies to be listed on my website soon. The Florida shows begin with the Miami National Antiques Show on January 24, 2015.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Excellent results at Sotheby’s New York Tiffany: Dreaming in Glass auction, December 17, 2014

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Sotheby’s New York held its Tiffany: Dreaming in Glass auction yesterday, December 17, 2014 with total sales of $6,585,875. 36 of the 41 lots offered sold, for an average of $182,941. Most of the Tiffany lamps sold near or above their high estimates.

Tiffany Wisteria table lamp, Sotheby's lot #216

Tiffany Wisteria table lamp, Sotheby’s lot #216

Leading the sale were two nearly identical Tiffany Wisteria table lamps, selling for $1,145,000 and $1,205,000, respectively. Both were outstanding examples.

Tiffany  table lamp, Sotheby's lot #218

Tiffany table lamp, Sotheby’s lot #218

The third best-selling lot of the sale was a Tiffany 22″ diameter Drop-Head Dragonfly table lamp with a vividly colored shade and an important mosaic and turtleback glass base. The lamp sold for $965,000, against a pre-sale estimate of $600,000 — $900,000.

Tiffany Poppy paperweight vase, Sotheby's lot #207

Tiffany Poppy paperweight vase, Sotheby’s lot #207

The top lot of the glass section of the sale was #207, a paperweight vase with Poppy decoration. It sold for $87,500, easily exceeding its high estimate of $50,000.

For the complete results of the sale, click here.

I won’t cover Christie’s Tiffany Studios auction of December 9, 2014. It was too depressing. I can’t begin to explain why Sotheby’s did so much better than Christie’s, but they did. You’re on your own for Christie’s results.


miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next five weeks looking for treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. So far the buying has been great, so look for lots of new goodies to be listed on my website soon. The Florida shows begin with the Miami National Antiques Show on January 24, 2015.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Unfortunately, there won’t be an important antiques show in downtown Chicago this spring

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


The Chicago Merchandise Mart

The Chicago Merchandise Mart

You probably remember there was no antique show at the Merchandise Mart this past April. It all started when the Palm Beach Show Group couldn’t reach agreement with the Merchandise Mart and went off on their own to create a show at the Navy Pier. As a result, the Merchandise Mart couldn’t get enough exhibitors for their show and shut it down. With higher expenses for the dealers and lower sales at the Navy Pier, many of the show exhibitors balked and did not resign for another Navy Pier show. So the Merchandise Mart is reluctant to start another antique show and the Palm Beach Show Group doesn’t feel like gambling on a second Navy Pier show.

An aerial view of Chicago's Navy Pier

An aerial view of Chicago’s Navy Pier

Where does that leave the dealers and the public? Between a rock and a hard place. It feels like a bad case of Humpty Dumpty — all the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t put Humpty together again. Now everybody suffers. I know I feel it. Chicago is my best city. The fewer times I exhibit there, the lower my income — plain and simple. I’ve built up a great clientele there over many years and now there are very few opportunities to exhibit. There’s no more Arlington Racetrack, no more Rosemont summer show, and now no downtown show. UGH!!

I spoke to one promoter who is looking for a downtown facility to host a smaller show, but who knows if that will become a reality. In the meantime, I’ve got to rely on only two shows in the greater Chicago area — the fall show in Winnetka and the Chicago Botanic Gardens in the spring. It’s frustrating when I have no control.


miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next month and a half looking for treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. So far the buying has been great, so look for lots of new goodies. The Florida shows begin with the Miami National Antiques Show on January 24, 2015.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

Newcomb College pottery sells well at Waddington’s Decorative Arts auction, December 9, 2014

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Waddington’s of Toronto, Canada, held a Decorative Arts auction on December 9, 2014. Included in the sale were two very nice Newcomb College scenic vases, estimated very reasonably. I had hoped to sneak up on them, since Newcomb College pottery seemed out of place in Toronto, but I was wrong. The vases sold very well so I was unable to buy them.

Newcomb College scenic vase, Waddington lot #126

Newcomb College scenic vase, Waddington lot #126

First up was lot #126, a tall (11″), inverted trumpet, Newcomb College scenic vase, decorated by Anna Frances Simpson in 1912. It exceeded its high estimate of $3,500, realizing CAD 5,060, (USD 4,419).

Newcomb College scenic vase, Waddington lot #127

Newcomb College scenic vase, Waddington lot #127

Lot #127 was an unusual scenic with tall pine trees, also by Anna Frances Simpson, 8½” tall. This was an earlier transitional example from 1909. (Early Newcomb vases were high glaze and later vases were matte glaze.) It was estimated to sell for $2,000—3,000, but more than doubled it’s high estimate to realize CAD 9,000, (USD 7,858) including buyer’s premium.

For the complete catalog, click here. As of the writing of this blog post, the results have not yet been posted to their website.


miami-national-show-1-2015I’ll be spending the next month and a half looking for treasures to bring to Florida for our southern circuit. The Florida shows begin with the Miami National Antiques Show on January 24, 2015.

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.