The Art Glass Forum began its season with a lecture on Louis C. Tiffany, October 4, 2016

My goal is to publish new posts twice a week — Mondays and Thursdays. However, if you don’t see a new post on Thursday, it’s because I was too busy, so please look for a new one the following Monday.


Tiffany Water Lily table lamp, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Grant, 1974

Tiffany Water Lily table lamp, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Grant, 1974

The Art Glass Forum began its season this past Tuesday with a very interesting and informative lecture by Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, curator of American Decorative Arts of the Metropolitan Museum of Art since 1994, on the works of Louis C. Tiffany. She is recognized as one of the world’s leading authorities on the life and works of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Ms. Frelinghuysen made it clear that the museum would not own today’s fabulous collection if it weren’t for the generosity of many patrons, including Henry Osborne Havemeyer in 1896, followed by Robert Weeks DeForest and Emily Johnston DeForest early in the 20th century, Louis C. Tiffany himself, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Williams in 1969, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh J. Grant in 1974, Robert Koch, Lillian Nassau, and many others.

Tiffany Favrile Peacock vase, from the Havemeyer donation

Tiffany Favrile Peacock vase, from the Havemeyer donation

The Met’s Louis Comfort Tiffany collection began in 1896 with a donation of 56 blown Favrile glass vases and roundels from Henry Osborne Havemeyer, the sugar magnate, and one of the first collectors of Favrile glass.

Tiffany American Indian chandelier

Tiffany American Indian chandelier

In 1899, Tiffany was asked to design the interior of a home owned by Robert and Emily de Forest in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, near Tiffany’s country estate, Laurelton Hall. Even though Tiffany was asked to create a floral shade for the home, he purportedly responded “That is not what you need for your hall, you need an Indian Basket”, as the de Forests owned a large collection of Indian baskets and pottery. The result was a spectacular chandelier in the American Indian pattern. The chandelier did not make it into the Met’s collection until it was donated in 1969 by Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Williams, in memory of the de Forests.

Tiffany mosaic fountain, contribution of Lillian Nassau

Tiffany mosaic fountain, contribution of Lillian Nassau

One of the more spectacular items in the Met’s collection is a mosaic fountain, donated by Lillian Nassau in 1976. The background is entirely made of tiny mosaic tiles, called tesserae. It’s incredible in person.

The collection is much more extensive than I can cover here, including pottery, enamels, furniture, fabrics, jewelry and art. So I suggest you do two things. First visit the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art when you’re in New York. If Tiffany interests you, the museum’s collection will enchant you. The second is to join the Art Glass Forum and attend their monthly lectures. Click here for a link to their website.


Cute glass "food"

Cute glass “food”

I hope to put together videos of the glassblowing demonstration we saw in Murano, Italy, for uploading to youtube soon. You’ll want to see it if the process of glassblowing interests you.


winnetka-2016Our next show will be in Winnetka, Illinois, November 4-6, 2016. This is our only fall show in the greater Chicago area (and probably our last show of the year). We always look forward to exhibiting there, especially to see all our friends and clients. Put it in your calendar. It’s a lovely show!

Click here to check my website for the latest items and to look around. I will update it as often as time permits. We’re still very much in business between shows, so please don’t hesitate to email or call. I always strive to offer the finest objects for sale on my website and at every show. There are many items for sale, sold items with prices and free lessons about glass and lamps. And remember to keep reading my blog.

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