Results from the new Atlantic City Antiques Show, March 27-28, 2010

My booth at the Atlantic City Antique Show, 3/28/10

My booth at the Atlantic City Antique Show, 3/28/10

I stopped exhibiting at the Atlantique City Antiques show a couple of years ago, as the show had deteriorated in terms of the number and quality of exhibitors and the attendance. I correctly predicted that the show would ultimately fail. After the demise of the original show, Allison Kohler of JMK Shows revived the show, which was held this past weekend. She asked me to exhibit there, which I did, even though I was quite reluctant. I wanted to support Allison and hoped the new edition of the show would be successful. Unfortunately for me, the show did not go well. Sales were few and far between, but I was able to buy well at the show, so ultimately it won’t be a loss. If I had to rely on sales alone, I would have lost money at the show, a rarity for me.

12:45 PM, Sunday, at the Atlantic City Antiques Show

12:45 PM, Sunday, at the Atlantic City Antiques Show

Attendance at the show was moderate on Saturday and slow on Sunday. It never appeared crowded, but that’s partly due to the huge size of the exhibit hall. Parking spaces were at a premium as Mary Kay Cosmetics and a cheerleading competition were holding their conventions simultaneously at the Convention Center. The show was too quiet most of the time. Pleasant, quiet music over the PA system would have been helpful, especially to mask the noise coming from the cheerleading competition next door.

I spoke to a number of exhibitors at the show about their results. One dealer told me she did very well. Another said he sold well to the dealers pre-show, but did not make a sale to the public once the show opened. Another told me he did better at this show than the Pier Show a couple of weeks earlier. Most dealers told me their shows were OK and a few told me their results were poor. Interestingly enough, most dealers said they were signing up again for next year, even those that lost money. They wanted to give the show another opportunity but I’m not one of them. Personally, Atlantic City doesn’t seem to be a good fit for me, so I won’t be returning. I wish Allison, JMK Shows, and all future exhibitors the best of luck in coming years. Hopefully with enough tweaks, sufficient advertising and good word of mouth, the show will improve each year. Meanwhile, I’m looking in another direction, toward my upcoming shows in Chicago and Los Angeles. I’ve got many friends and clients there, so I’m looking forward to visiting next month in April. Here’s the link to my exact show schedule. Philip Chasen Antiques show schedule.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog.

The NEW Atlantic City Antiques & Collectors Show is this weekend, March 27-28, 2010

The original Atlantic City Convention Hall

The original Atlantic City Convention Hall

The Atlantique City antique show used to be a big deal. It started in the original Convention Hall on the boardwalk. Attendance was so heavy that people would form two lines, each a mile long, in opposite directions on the boardwalk. The huge show was always packed. It was a very diverse show, with a strong emphasis on antique toys, although I’m not sure how that happened.

The new Atlantic City Convention Center

The new Atlantic City Convention Center

Upon completion of the new Convention Center, the show moved and continued to thrive for a few years. As time passed, the show started to flounder and began to shrink. A vicious cycle started as fewer dealers exhibited, followed by fewer attendees, round and round until the show failed.

Allison Kohler, the owner of JMK Shows

Allison Kohler, the owner of JMK Shows

Fast forward. In stepped Allison Kohler of JMK Shows to revive the show. I emailed Allison a couple of questions. Here are her answers.

Q. What’s NEW about The NEW Atlantic City Antiques & Collectors Show?
A. We changed the name of the show to let people know they were going to have a new experience — it was important. People were very discouraged and disappointed the last few years. We made a number of changes to make for a better experience for the customer and the exhibitor. We lowered the price of admission. We lowered booth rents and made the booths larger. We also created 2 separate contracts to structure the show by merchandise, an antiques contract and a collectibles contract. We changed the structure of the show so no more Barbies next to Tiffany lamps, although there are still Barbies and still Tiffany lamps. We created what I believe to be a better flow and energy and a much better look to the show. The front section when you walk in is now a hard-walled section, with a number of quality vendors who will be participating for the first time in AC. All tables will be covered to the floor, no more cardboard boxes on tables, nothing flea markety/garage sale. We added a number of special features that pertain to our industry, not the circus. Glass, porcelain restoration, the appraisal center, the Doulton convention. We have 2 personalities who are very well known within their respective fields, bringing their support to the show. Harry Rinker, host of “Whatcha Got” is doing his radio show from the building Sunday morning. Also, Louise Irvine, a leading expert in the Doulton Field, will be on hand all weekend.

Q. What advertising have you put in place?
A. We have 80 banners around town that had been discontinued a number of shows ago, as well as signs at all the toll booths. I was down there last week for a meeting and they were already up. We have radio. We are also sponsoring the traffic and weather on a major radio station the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday before the show. We are in a number of major papers with very good size ads –the New York Times, Baltimore Sun, Washington Post, etc. We have dozens of smaller papers throughout New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. We have done a number of different dedicated email blasts from different databases. Four from the Antique Trader, one each week leading up to the show; Morphy’s Auction sent a dedicated email this past week and then the JMK Shows list. Those emails encompassed hundreds of thousands of names. We are in every trade paper that we are aware of in the United States and even the Antiques Trade Gazette in England. We have 100s of posters and over 100,000 distributed show cards. Many exhibitors helped participate in the distribution and hanging of the posters, for which we are very grateful. We have web advertising as well as social media sites. We have the Media Center of the Convention Center also working in conjunction with us to do even more PR. I believe they have channel 6 scheduled to come in on Friday and do a live segment and a number of other extra write ups, calendar listings, things to do this weekend, etc.

There will be extra services as follows:

- Expert Glass Repair Clinic by Paul Nulton – SATURDAY & SUNDAY.
- Expert Porcelain & Pottery Restoration Clinic – SATURDAY ONLY.
- Certified Appraisal Clinic – SATURDAY & SUNDAY, $5 per Item

I’ll be there with a great selection of the best quality Tiffany Studios items, including some new ones you haven’t seen. I’ll also have the best French cameo glass and Louis Icart etchings. Please come to the show and make this new edition a success.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog.

Superb results for French Cameo Glass at two Christie’s NY Sales, March 2 & March 16, 2010

Christie’s New York held an Interiors sale on March 2, 2010, where lower-end items are sold, mostly from estates. These lower-end items would be considered higher-end at many other auction houses, but not at Christie’s or Sotheby’s. Included in the diverse sale were 27 lots of French cameo glass, many still left from the vast collection of Simon Pinhas. The results were strong, with a few of the lots bringing exceptional prices.

Daum vase with herons, Christie's lot 225, March 2, 2010

Daum vase with herons, Christie's lot 225, March 2, 2010

Lot 225 was a Daum bowl with a desirable herons in flight decoration. Medium size at 5″ tall, it was estimated at $2-3,000. On a good day, it should have sold for a maximum of $10,000, but on this day it sold for $32,500, including buyer’s premium — 10 times the high estimate. That’s impressive. Helllooo, bidders at Christie’s. I’ve got some really nice French cameo glass for sale for a lot less money.

Daum winter scenic vase, Christie's lot 217, March 2, 2010

Daum winter scenic vase, Christie's lot 217, March 2, 2010

Daum winter scenic vases have been desirable for many years, usually commanding a premium over other scenic vases. But on March 2nd, the premium got a lot higher. Lot 217 was a nice Daum winter scenic vase, 10″ tall. It carried a pre-sale estimate of $2-3,000 and should have sold for two or three times the high estimate. Bidders on this day pushed the price to $20,000, including buyer’s premium — an outstanding price for a winter scenic.

Use this link to view all the results for the French cameo glass at Christie’s Interior sale of March 2, 2010. French cameo glass at Christie’s Interior sale.

Gallé fire-polished vase, Christie's lot 25, March 16, 2010.

Gallé fire-polished vase, Christie's lot 25, March 16, 2010.

The party continued with a few lots of French cameo glass in the 20th Century Decorative Art & Design sale of March 16, 2010. Several items brought exceptionally strong prices, starting with lot 25, a Gallé fire-polished vase, 12″ tall. To my eyes, the vase was nothing exceptional and should have sold within the pre-sale estimate of $4-6,000, but apparently the bidders disagreed. They pushed the price to $30,000, including buyer’s premium.

Several other lots soared past their pre-sale estimates, including a Daum winter scenic vase in the style of Muller at $30,000, a monumental Muller vase with poppies at $35,000 and a Daum Art Deco vase with wheel-carving at $37,500. It’s a pleasure to see such strength in the French cameo glass market. Hopefully it will be felt everywhere, not just at Christie’s.

Here’s the link to the French cameo glass results at Christie’s March 16, 2010 sale. French cameo glass at Christie’s March 16, 2010 auction.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Follow-up to the Miami National Antiques Show

The Miami National Antiques Show, January 28-30, 2011

The Miami National Antiques Show, January 28-30, 2011

On January 18, 2010, I reported about the results of the Miami National Antiques Show, which was held at the Miami Merchandise Mart from January 15-17, 2010. Apparently I was too blunt, which for better or worse, is my usual style. I used some strong terms to describe what I saw as an unfortunate turn of events for the show, as this year there were fewer exhibitors and lower attendance, especially on Saturday. On a personal level, my show went fairly well, so I renewed again for next year. What I didn’t expect was that my blog would reverberate beyond the several hundred people who read it. Many inferred that I was predicting the immediate demise of the show. They questioned whether there would be a Miami National Antiques Show next year in January of 2011. The answer is a resounding yes!

Rosemary Krieger and staff, Charlie Walter (left) and Gordon Merkle (right)

Rosemary Krieger and staff, Charlie Walter (left) and Gordon Merkle (right)

Rosemary Krieger, the owner of Dolphin Promotions, the promoter of the show, has personally assured me that she is determined to insure the success and continuation of the show. She is starting her advertising campaign for next year well in advance of her usual time schedule, with aggressive advertising to the public. The campaign will include television, which has not been done for some time for the show. The previous advertising campaign included newspapers, trade publications and radio, but no TV. A number of people from the public remarked to me that they had not seen any of the advertising, so a return to television will be beneficial.

The Merchandise Mart is undergoing a complete renovation, which should be complete by the end of October, 2010, well in advance of the show in January, 2011. It will be renamed the Miami Airport Convention Center (MACC). The new facility, coupled with increased advertising, should bode well for the success of the show next year. As is usual, the Original Miami Beach Antiques Show will follow the next week.

Rosemary Krieger is a professional who does a fine job at all of her shows from Miami to Chicago to Los Angeles. Here’s wishing Rosemary the best of luck for continued success.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

What is Stickybits?

Billy Chasen

Billy Chasen

Today’s post has nothing to do with antiques, but rather my son, Billy Chasen, and his latest creation, Stickybits, which was launched a few days ago. Billy is a software engineer with a very fertile imagination, who would rather be called an inventor. His latest idea is so clever, I predict it will be a major success. The proud father wants to tell you about it at this early stage.

Basically, Stickybits allows digital information to be attached to a bar code. First you download the free app on your smart phone, like the iPhone or Google Android phone. Then you scan a sticker with a bar code and attach any digital information you want to the sticker. The sticker can physically be attached to anything, like your computer or a greeting card or a bottle of prescription medication. If the concept is a little fuzzy, let me give you a specific example. Let’s say I buy a birthday card for Aunt Vicky with a Stickybits bar code inside. I line up the whole family and record a video singing happy birthday to Aunt Vicky. Then I attach the video to the Stickybits bar code and mail the card to Aunt Vicky. When Aunt Vicky receives the card, she uses her smart phone to scan the bar code and voila, she watches the video. The information is automatically encoded with GPS information and a trail is formed. Information is added every time the code is scanned.

Stickybits logo

Stickybits logo

How about this? I’m going to put a Stickybits bar code on my business card. I can attach and change the information as often as I like. One day if you scan the code, you might see a photo of my latest purchase, or a link to my blog. On another day, there might be a video of me and Lia wishing you a Merry Christmas.

How about tagging an object with Stickybits and sending it on a random trip around the world, a modern-day version of message in a bottle? Everyone who picks it up can add their information to the trail of its travels with automatic GPS locations. That would make a cool TV show.

The possibilities are limitless, which is what’s so nice about this technology. Billy and his group have come up with lots of suggestions about what can be done with Stickybits, but there are many more possibilities that haven’t even been dreamt up yet. Once the technology becomes ubiquitous, the true potential will start to be realized. More information is available at http://stickybits.com. The idea is getting a lot of publicity and buzz. Here are links to several of the articles that have been written. The LA Times at http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technology/2010/03/stickybits-barcodes-social-network.html. CNET at http://news.cnet.com/8301-13577_3-10467485-36.html?tag=mncol;txt Ecoconsultancy.com at http://econsultancy.com/blog/5592-q-a-stickibits-founder-billy-chasen

What do you think? Email me at philchasen@aol.com.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Results from the NYC Pier Show, March 13-14, 2010

Sunday afternoon at the NYC Pier Show, March 14, 2010

Sunday afternoon at the NYC Pier Show, March 14, 2010

The weather in NYC was miserable this weekend, especially Saturday. Heavy, steady rain accompanied by strong wind, made for a rough day. Ordinary inclement weather is usually good for attendance and business at shows, but awful weather can have a negative effect. Attendance was down from the previous show, but still decent. The show didn’t have its usual buzz and snap. Business was off on Saturday from the previous show, but not drastically.

Very attractive Gallé 10-inch scenic vase

Very attractive Gallé 10-inch scenic vase

Sunday’s weather was slightly improved — just nasty, but not raining cats and dogs and not nearly as windy. Attendance got off to a very slow start because the show opened at 10 AM. There is no good reason whatsoever for a show to open at 10 AM on a Sunday, especially with the change to Daylight Savings Time. Everyone’s body clock told them it was 9 AM. Anyway, most people sleep late on Sunday. For the first hour and a half, dealers were all sitting around waiting for the first person to come and ask a question. Everyone would do the same business if the show hours were 11 AM – 5 PM on Sunday and the dealers would all be elated. (Hello Irene. [Irene Stella is the promoter of the show.] How about it?)

Superior quality Tiffany 12-inch blue Favrile vase with green hearts and vines

Superior quality Tiffany 12-inch blue Favrile vase with green hearts and vines

Business picked up a little on Sunday, but overall sales were somewhat disappointing. Sales were diverse at the show, with Tiffany, Quezal, Gallé, Daum, and Icart garnering the most interest. In speaking to several other exhibitors, most were satisfied with their results, but none were ebullient.

Now here’s something not to do at a show. Les Fisher, an Italian restaurant owner from the south shore of Long Island, came into my booth on Saturday. He decided to buy an expensive Art Nouveau bronze, and after a bit of negotiation, he agreed to purchase it if I gave him time to pay it off. I do that with lots of people, so I had no problem with the arrangements. He shook my hand, told me he would be in on Sunday, not only with a significant deposit, but lunch from his restaurant. Very nice. The only problem is that Les never showed up, never called, and never answered two phone calls. Not only is that not nice, but irresponsible, inconsiderate and rude. The item was marked sold for several hours and as a result, might possibly have resulted in the loss of the sale to another client. The courtesy of a phone call would have been the least that he should have done.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass, Daum Nancy glass, Tiffany Studios glass and Marblehead pottery, to name a few. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

The NYC Pier Show is coming this weekend, March 13-14, 2010

The NYC Pier Show, March 13-14, 2010

The NYC Pier Show, March 13-14, 2010

There are only a few shows each year that get people excited. The NYC Pier Show is one of them and it’s coming this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, March 13-14. Last fall’s show was a resounding success with incredible attendance. I haven’t seen the aisles as packed in years. It appears that the antiques business in general seems to be a leading indicator of the direction of the entire economy, and that’s up. On the New York Stock Exchange, Sotheby’s stock is near a multi-year high.

16 inch Tiffany Favrile Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase

16 inch Tiffany Favrile Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase

What’s so special about the show? Mostly it’s great fun, because there’s an enormously eclectic group of dealers from high end Tiffany glass and lamps (that would be me) to vintage clothing and everything in-between. The expenses for exhibitors at this show are quite reasonable for the level of exposure. It allows many interesting dealers to exhibit, who might not otherwise be able to afford to exhibit at fancier shows. The show is frequented by many decorators who find the most unusual items at the show for their clients. Buyers fly into town from all over the world, including Japan and Europe. It’s a great excuse to come to New York and enjoy the show and the city. You won’t regret it! And wait until you see some of the characters who attend. They’re a hoot!

Wonderful Tiffany Favrile 12 inch decorated vase

Wonderful Tiffany Favrile 12 inch decorated vase

I’m bringing lots of new acquisitions that are special. How about a 12″ blue decorated Tiffany Favrile vase of the finest quality? A Tiffany Jack-in-the-Pulpit vase? Or an Argy-Rousseau Poppy vase? This is just a taste of the wonderful items I’m bringing.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass (including a blownout vase), Daum Nancy glass and Tiffany Studios glass. Soon I’ll be adding pottery by Newcomb College, Marblehead and Rookwood. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Pate-de-verre French glass by A. Walter and Argy-Rousseau, part II

The same Argy-Rousseau Cicada pendant in two color variations, Catalogue Raisonné No. 23.30

The same Argy-Rousseau Cicada pendant in two color variations, Catalogue Raisonné No. 23.30

French pâte-de-verre (pronounced pot, as in pot of stew) glass is amongst the most highly collectible of all French glass. Joseph-Gabriel Argy-Rousseau was one of the early proponents of this style of glass. He designed the original models from which the molds were made for the actual production of the glassware. Once the mold was made, it was possible to produce multiple examples of the same item. However, no two items were identical, as the mold was refilled with glass powders by hand, producing color variations. Many times, totally different colors were intentionally used, so the same model item can be found in completely different colors.

1924 Argy-Rousseau Poppy vase, Catalogue Raisonné No. 24.05

1924 Argy-Rousseau Poppy vase, Catalogue Raisonné No. 24.05

Argy-Rousseau produced many more vases than Almeric Walter, one of the other important French pâte-de-verre artists. Walter preferred to work with three-dimensional models of animals and flowers. He is most famous for his creatures, including lizards, butterflies, and bees, to name a few.

A. Walter butterfly paperweight

A. Walter butterfly paperweight

G. Argy-Rousseau book cover by Janine Bloch-Dermant

G. Argy-Rousseau book cover by Janine Bloch-Dermant

A wonderful book on the glass of Argy-Rousseau was published in 1991 by Janine Bloch-Dermant, entitled G. Argy-Rousseau, Glassware as Art. Included at the end of the book is a complete listing (Catalogue Raisonné) of all of the work by Argy-Rousseau. Each item was given a number, like 24.05, which meant the item was the fifth design from 1924. I checked on Amazon and there are a few copies of the book available, new and used, starting at $56.46.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass (including a blownout vase), Daum Nancy glass and Tiffany Studios glass. Soon I’ll be adding pottery by Newcomb College, Marblehead and Rookwood. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Doyle New York’s 2/24/10 Belle Epoque auction was a success

Doyle New York holds a Belle Epoque auction twice yearly. It’s a diverse sale of objects from 19th Century Victorian to Art Nouveau, Art Deco and some modern. The winter sale was held on February 24, 2010 with generally excellent results. I asked the expert in charge, Malcolm MacNeil for his impressions of the the sale. Here is his reply.

Tiffany Studios Venetian table lamp, Doyle lot #335

Tiffany Studios Venetian table lamp, Doyle lot #335

“I was extremely pleased with the results of yesterday’s Belle Époque auction. It is a popular sale and always widely anticipated with lots of local, national and international interest. With respect to the art glass, there were approximately 59 lots. As one would expect, items having the greatest dealer and collector interest because of rarity, quality, good condition and desirability had the greatest interest and competitive bidding and generated good results. Of the 20 art glass lots that had an auction pre-sale estimate of $2,000 or higher only one lot failed to sell. It was a green geometric leaded glass shade attributed to Tiffany Studios and estimated at $3,000-5000. It had a high reserve and although it was felt that the glass was indeed by Kokomo (one of Tiffany’s suppliers), alas, it was not by the firm of Tiffany Studios. Returning to the 20 lots having an auction pre-sale low estimate of $2,000 or higher, 9 lots sold below the low estimate and 9 lots sold above the low estimate. Two of the highlights were a Tiffany Studios bronze and leaded favrile glass desk lamp in the Venetian pattern, estimated at $40,000-50,000, which sold for $65,000, plus buyer’s premium, and a Tiffany Studios leaded glass and bronze hanging shade estimated at $70,000-90,000, which sold for $110,000, plus buyer’s premium. Other items in the sale had spectacular results, including furniture, silver and porcelain. Good quality is selling well and great quality is selling very well.”

Handel Connecticut River scenic table lamp, Doyle lot #304

Handel Connecticut River scenic table lamp, Doyle lot #304

Other items which performed well were a Handel obverse and reverse-painted scenic table lamp, estimated for $3-5,000 that sold for $10,625, including buyer’s premium, several good Quezal shades that descended in the family of Edward Conlan, the secretary of the Quezal Art Glass and Decorating Co., and a green Tiffany Studios millifiori decorated vase, estimated at $2,500-3,500, that sold for $9,375, including buyer’s premium. Here is the link for the results for the entire sale. Doyle Belle Epoque results.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass (including a blownout vase), Daum Nancy glass and Tiffany Studios glass. Soon I’ll be adding pottery by Newcomb College, Marblehead and Rookwood. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.

Results from the Morristown Armory Antiques Show

My booth at the Morristown Armory Antiques Show

My booth at the Morristown Armory Antiques Show

The Northeast has been hammered with several major snowstorms this winter, with the latest one starting last Thursday. The rain/snow line was I-95 in New Jersey, with snow to the west. Unfortunately Morristown, NJ is west of the line, so the show started out with one strike against it. Many people called the show management to see if the show was canceled, but conditions improved rapidly, so there was no problem. The show opened on time, but attendance on Saturday was a little slower than normal. Sunday attendance returned to normal.

Tiffany Studios Pine Needle paper rack (a smaller version than the one sold at the show)

Tiffany Studios Pine Needle paper rack (a smaller version than the one sold at the show)

Sales on Saturday were lackluster with interest in Tiffany desk pieces and Fulper pottery. Sales on Sunday were dismal, but interest was strong in a couple of important items that may sell after the show.

I still haven’t made up my mind as to whether I’ll return to exhibit in Morristown. I’ll wait to see if any sales develop after the show. Right now, it’s probable that I won’t be back. It’s not enough for people to admire my display. The local people have to support the show by purchasing from the exhibitors or the exhibitors won’t be back.

I’m taking a lot of time to add new items to my website. I’ve already listed new items under Gallé glass (including a blownout vase), Daum Nancy glass and Tiffany Studios glass. Soon I’ll be adding pottery by Newcomb College, Marblehead and Rookwood. Please take a look, as every day I’m adding more. Click on this link chasenantiques.com.

Please send me your suggestions or questions about art glass, lamps, Louis Icart, shows, auctions, etc. If it’s interesting, I’ll answer your question in a future blog entry.